Filtering by: Cambodia

Last Night I Saw You Smiling - Yub Menh Bong Keunh Oun Nho Nhim
Apr
28
4:30 PM16:30

Last Night I Saw You Smiling - Yub Menh Bong Keunh Oun Nho Nhim

  • Francesca Beale Theater, Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Q&A with Kavich Neang

Once a thriving artist community and cultural hub, Phnom Penh’s historic White Building has been sold to Japanese condo developers, displacing nearly 500 families. Born and raised in the building, filmmaker Kavich Neang returns to interview friends, neighbors, and family as they prepare to uproot, stirring up the dust and memories that have accumulated in the building’s walls. As longtime residents somberly reflect on their old home and its imminent destruction, summoning memories of Cambodia’s post-independence golden age and of similar evictions during the Khmer Rouge, Neang captures the serene light and music its storied hallways one last time.

For more information and to buy tickets, click here

Hosted by: 

  • Film Society of Lincoln Center

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The Justice Facade: Genocide, International Justice, and Human Rights in Cambodia
Apr
17
12:30 PM12:30

The Justice Facade: Genocide, International Justice, and Human Rights in Cambodia

  • 726 Broadway New York, NY, 10003 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Is there a point to international justice? Many contend that tribunals deliver not only justice but truth, reconciliation, peace, democratization, and the rule of law. These are the transitional justice ideals frequently invoked in relation to the international hybrid tribunal in Cambodia that is trying senior leaders of the Khmer Rouge regime for genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the mid-to-late 1970s. In this ground-breaking book, The Justice Facade, Alexander Hinton argues these claims are a facade masking what is most critical: the ways in which transitional justice is translated, experienced, and understood in everyday life. Rather than reading the Khmer Rouge Tribunal in the language of global justice and human rights, survivors understand the proceedings in their own terms, including Buddhist beliefs and on-going relationships with the spirits of the dead.

Alexander Hinton is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Global Affairs, Director of the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights, and UNESCO Chair on Genocide Prevention at Rutgers University, Newark. He is a past President of the International Association of Genocide Scholars and served as an expert witness at the Khmer Rouge Tribunal.

To RSVP, click here

Hosted by: 

  • NYSEAN

  • NYU Wagner's Office of International Programs

  • NYU's Liberal Studies Program

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The Moth Featuring Arn Chorn-Pond: A Live Podcast Taping
Nov
8
6:30 PM18:30

The Moth Featuring Arn Chorn-Pond: A Live Podcast Taping

  • 157 Montague Street Brooklyn, NY, 11201 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Moth shows are renowned for the great range of human experience they showcase. Each show starts with a theme, and the storytellers explore it, often in unexpected ways.

The Moth podcast is downloaded more than 50 million times a year, and each week, the Peabody Award-winning Moth Radio Hour is heard on over 480 radio stations worldwide. The Moth’s first book, The Moth: 50 True Stories was a NYT Bestseller.

This memorable evening, to be hosted by Dame Wilburn will feature stories from bestselling author Elizabeth Gilbert, human rights activist and musician Arn Chorn-Pond, Moth GrandSLAM Champion Monte Montepare, and more.

Email development@cambodianlivingarts.com to buy $40 tickets. 

Hosted by Cambodian Living Arts.

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Cambodian Artists in Conversation with New York City
Nov
4
4:00 PM16:00

Cambodian Artists in Conversation with New York City

This event marks the conclusion of a five-week Fellowship to the USA for three Cambodian artists. Tan Vatey, Tor Vutha and Hang Sokharo have spent four weeks in residency at Vermont Studio Center, followed by a 10-day program of research and networking in New York City, coordinated by Cambodian Living Arts. During this facilitated conversation, the artists will present the ideas and questions they are taking away from their time in the USA and how they plan to apply these experiences to their work at home in Cambodia. Guests will be encouraged to share questions and reflections with the artists.

This event is free and open to the public. 

Hosted by NYSEAN, Asia Society, and Cambodian Living Arts.

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Margaret Mead Film Festival: Collectively in Conversation
Oct
21
8:00 PM20:00

Margaret Mead Film Festival: Collectively in Conversation

  • American Museum of Natural History (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Collectively highlights groundbreaking community-based media collectives. Using audio and visual media from the Bophana Center in Cambodia, Maisha Film Lab in East Africa and Vídeonas Aldeias | Video in the Villages in the Brazilian Amazon, participants will discuss their work and its circulation. Joining us are acclaimed directors Rithy Panh, founder of Bophana Center, Vídeo Nas Aldeais’ founder Vincent Carelli, and Mira Nair, who started Maisha with the motto “If we don’t tell our own stories, no one else will.” 

Co-presented by the NYU Center for Media, Culture and History, Department of Anthropology

Purchase tickets here.

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Margaret Mead Film Festival: Graves Without a Name
Oct
20
4:00 PM16:00

Margaret Mead Film Festival: Graves Without a Name

  • American Musem of Natural History (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Filmmaker Rithy Panh explores the lasting effects of the Cambodian genocide through stories of those who have lost their families and have begun searching for their graves. Driven by Panh’s own desire to know the whereabouts of his many murdered loved ones, the film focuses on the spiritual well-being of those affected by the genocide. Graves Without a Namemakes a small but significant step toward rectifying the lack of documentation around the crimes of the Khmer Rouge, petitioning not for vengeance but, rather, for healing.

Find more information here.

Hosted by the American Museum of Natural History.

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The Legacy and Impact of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia
Apr
10
6:30 PM18:30

The Legacy and Impact of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

  • NYU-SPS Center for Global Affairs, 4th Floor (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Since it officially began operations in 2007, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) has been trying high-level Khmer Rouge leaders on charges, including genocide, regarding the approximately 1.9 million fatalities  in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge. The Court has been at the center of much attention, drawing both praise and criticism from local andinternational observers.Join CGA faculty professors Jennifer Trahan and Chris Ankersen in dialogue with panelists who have been involved in the Court to discuss its legacy and implications for international justice and war crimes prosecutions globally.

Panelists:

  • Robert Petit, First International Co-Prosecutor for the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

  • Andrew Cayley, Second International Co-Prosecutor for the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

  • David J. Scheffer, Former UN Secretary-General Special Expert on UN Assistance to the Khmer Rouge Trials

  • James A. Goldston, Executive Director, Open Society Justice Initiative

Register here.

Hosted by NYU-SPS Center for Global Affairs.

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Rediscovering Cham Heritage in Cambodia: Language, Script, and Community
Mar
19
6:00 PM18:00

Rediscovering Cham Heritage in Cambodia: Language, Script, and Community

  • Walsh Library, Seton Hall University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Prof. Jorge López Cortina, of the Dept. of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, will discuss the Cham Heritage Extension Program, a literacy project that ran between 2011 and 2017 and saw the first formal attempts to produce literacy materials for the Western Cham language and train instructors as advocates of Cham literacy to the wider community.

Initially envisioned as a small literacy project for a few villages, the program produced six textbooks and language guides, trained more than thirty Cham teachers, and served over 2,400 students. Most importantly, the program has expanded the scope of use of the written Cham language, producing not only textbooks, but children books, books of poetry, and a monthly general interest publication, Mukva, the first ever Cham language periodical. The program also established the Cham Language Advisory Committee, a body that watches over all these initiatives in order to ensure that the process of normalization of the Cham language is steered by the Cham community.

The Cham are a Muslim minority in Cambodia, an overwhelmingly Buddhist country. The Cham language belongs to the Austronesian family, which includes Tagalog, Malay and Hawai’ian, and is unrelated to Khmer, the majority language in Cambodia. Cham is the first Austronesian language documented, with texts going as far back as the 4th century CE. In spite of the rich history and literature of the Cham language, Cham literacy has been in decline for centuries, as Vietnam gained influence in the region and finally annexed the remains of the kingdom of Champa in 1832.

Prof. Jorge López Cortina is currently the director of the Spanish Program at Seton Hall University. Besides his involvement in Cham literacy projects, he has authored several texbooks in Spanish and coauthored the Khmer textbook used by the Peace Corps in Cambodia.

Find registration information here.

Hosted by Seton Hall University

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