Filtering by: Society
Demonstration: Cambodian Dance - Sophiline Arts Ensemble (First Performance)
Oct
20
2:00 PM14:00

Demonstration: Cambodian Dance - Sophiline Arts Ensemble (First Performance)

  • Level B1 Lobby, Arthur M. Sackler Gallery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Learn about classical and contemporary dances from Cambodia, their role in Buddhism, and their connections to Cambodian art on view in the Sackler. Members of the Sophiline Arts Ensemble in Phnom Penh demonstrate dances, with discussion facilitated by Emma Stein, Curatorial Fellow for Southeast Asian Art. These performances are presented in conjunction with Encountering the Buddha: Art and Practice across Asia. Lead Sponsor: The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation.

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 The Rohingya: Statelessness, Refugeehood and a 'Subhuman' Life
Oct
21
12:15 PM12:15

The Rohingya: Statelessness, Refugeehood and a 'Subhuman' Life

Considering the intensity of atrocity committed by the state forces in Myanmar, Rohingyas have been dealt with as if they are not human beings. Now, they are ‘struggling for existence’ in Bangladesh having an obscured past, critical present and an uncertain future. The Rohingyas belong to no state as Myanmar stripped of their citizenship four decades ago and Bangladesh does not recognize them even as refugees.

In this talk, Nasir Uddin, a cultural anthropologist based in Bangladesh, will present the current states of Rohingya in the Borderland of Bangladesh and Myanmar within the broader spectrum of statelessness, refugeehood and “subhuman life”.  

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Properties and Powers of the Matriarch: an Arab-Malay 'Great House' in Singapore in the 20th CENTURY
Oct
21
5:30 PM17:30

Properties and Powers of the Matriarch: an Arab-Malay 'Great House' in Singapore in the 20th CENTURY

  • Richard Ettinghausen Library at the Kevorkian Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Research Workshop with Michael Gilsenan and Discussant Mandana E. Limbert

This draft chapter is from a book on capital and kin in the Hadhrami Arab diaspora (roughly 1880-1980). It focuses on a 'great house' in Singapore and the woman who is represented as an extra-ordinary figure of originary powers. Sharifa Alwiya (1868-1968), from a major trading family, the AlJunied, is always known by her Malay honorific, Mak Tok. A woman of wealth and considerable property holdings, she is represented in repertoires of active memory as originating patterns of cuisine, medicine, a family habitus, and complex social practices through her unique powers. This emphasis on Mak Tok opens up avenues of exploration and rethinking of the forms and practices of kinship, genealogy, property and culture in the Hadhrami diaspora that diverge from dominant historical and anthropological perspectives.

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Top Down or Bottom Up? Politics and Society in Thailand and Indonesia
Nov
7
2:30 PM14:30

Top Down or Bottom Up? Politics and Society in Thailand and Indonesia

  • International Affairs Building, Columbia University, Room 918 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This panel discussion will look at the broad question of whether changes in society are happening as a result of political manipulation from the top; or because of substantive changes within culture, values and beliefs.

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Book Launch: Malaya by Cinelle Barnes
Nov
7
7:00 PM19:00

Book Launch: Malaya by Cinelle Barnes

From Cinelle Barnes, author of the memoir Monsoon Mansion, comes a moving and reflective essay collection about finding freedom in America.

Lyrical, emotionally driven, and told through stories both lived and overheard, Cinelle’s intensely personal, yet universal, exploration of race, class, and identity redefines what it means to be a woman—and an American—in a divided country.

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Religious and Cultural Drivers and Responses to Political Dynamics in Southeast Asia
Nov
8
8:30 AM08:30

Religious and Cultural Drivers and Responses to Political Dynamics in Southeast Asia

How and what role are religious communities and leaders playing in civic life in Southeast Asia today? Politics in Southeast Asia is in a dramatic state of flux. Populist and anti-democratic rule has taken hold in the Philippines, there is continued military rule in Thailand, louder and more forceful activism from conservative Muslim groups is taking place in Indonesia, and leaders are using Islam for political purposes, and we see victory for opposition parties in Malaysia. These are just some of the political dynamics in today's Southeast Asia.

Join us for a full day of presentations, a film screening of The Venerable W. Scholoars, and presentations by activists on their work addressing a range of topics and questions.

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Being Gay in the KDP: Politics in a Filipino American Revolutionary Organization (1973 to 1986)
Nov
22
6:00 PM18:00

Being Gay in the KDP: Politics in a Filipino American Revolutionary Organization (1973 to 1986)

  • Asian American / Asian Research Institute (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Prof. Karen B. Hanna (Connecticut College) will discuss her research, featured in CUNY FORUM Volume 6:1, into the KDP (Katipunan ng mga Demokratikong Pilipino) organization, from 1973 to 1986, and the exploration and views of sexuality during that era by its members. The KDP was arguably the most militant anti-imperialist national organization in the Filipina/o American community during the 1970s, fighting for civil rights and antiwar movements in the United States and democracy and national liberation in the Philippines and beyond.

What was it like to be LGBT in the KDP? How did LGBT members navigate homophobia and heteropatriarchy in the Third World Left, racism in the gay liberation movement, and the emerging AIDS crisis? Through original oral histories conducted with KDP members from 2015-2018, Hanna offers a glimpse of how activists negotiated and expressed emerging sexual identities while maintaining revolutionary political commitments in the KDP.

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Armed Forces, State, and Society in Southeast Asia: Identity, Authority, Legitimacy, Legacy
Dec
6
10:00 AM10:00

Armed Forces, State, and Society in Southeast Asia: Identity, Authority, Legitimacy, Legacy

In Southeast Asia today, there exists a range of arrangements along a spectrum. Some countries (such as Singapore, Malaysia, and the Philippines) operate, at least nominally, under a regime of objective control. In others, the military operates explicitly (Vietnam and Lao PDR) or implicitly (Cambodia) as a tool of the ruling political party. Indonesia is a former military dictatorship that has reformed its armed forces; Myanmar operates what might be called a transitional model.   Thailand has only recently emerged after five years of military rule, and the possibility of a return cannot be ruled out.  

This one-day conference, consisting of panel presentations and a roundtable, will explore the following key questions:

  1. What is the relationship between the military and the identity of the nation, people, or elites?

  2. What is the relationship between the military and political authority? 

  3. How does the military impact structures of legitimacy?

  4. What are the key principles, myths, or events that have helped shape the relationship between the military and the country?  Is that expected to change or remain the same in the future?

Professor Dr. Aurel Croissant (Professor of Political Science at the Institute of Political Science, Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg) will deliver a keynote address.  

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Film: "Folklore: Pob"
Oct
18
8:00 PM20:00

Film: "Folklore: Pob"

  • Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

HBO Asia’s miniseries Folklore presented tales of the supernatural from six Asian countries, based on each region’s traditional legends. One standout was Thailand’s entry, directed by acclaimed filmmaker Pen-ek Ratanaurang (Last Life in the UniverseHeadshot), who visited the Freer for a retrospective in 2014. Ratanaurang takes on the myth of the pob, a ghost known for devouring human intestines. When an American corporate executive is found murdered, a photojournalist covers the story, only to find himself meeting the pob who committed the crime and now wants to tell its side of the story. Shot in rich black and white tones, this film mixes horror and humor with a touch of politics. One of the the pob’s beefs, it turns out, is that the arrogant American refused to believe in ghosts.

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IF WE WERE XYZ (Second Performance)
Oct
18
3:00 PM15:00

IF WE WERE XYZ (Second Performance)

Indonesian artist Melati Suryodarmo premieres a durational performance work IF WE WERE XYZ at Asia Society. In this new work, she explores dreams—both in the sense of the subconscious experiences we have while sleeping and the conscious aspirations we have when awake. Drawing upon Javanese mysticism, traditional beliefs, the artist’s own dreams documented in a self-devised sleep laboratory, and other sources, Suryodarmo’s intensive research process leads to a visceral and immediate three-hour performance.

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Join Live: Union Activists Organizing and Fighting Repression in Asia
Oct
17
9:00 PM21:00

Join Live: Union Activists Organizing and Fighting Repression in Asia

The International Labor Rights Forum and Labor Notes are co-hosting a webinar, Snapshots of Organizing Across Asia, on how labor activists across Asia are building power in the face of multinational corporations. 

What are the opportunities and challenges for strengthening solidarity across the region? How can we organize in our own unions to build a movement that can tackle rising inequality across borders? How is state repression impacting how activists organize? These are some of the questions we hope to discuss with activists from Japan, Myanmar, and the Philippines. 

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IF WE WERE XYZ (First Performance)
Oct
17
3:00 PM15:00

IF WE WERE XYZ (First Performance)

Indonesian artist Melati Suryodarmo premieres a durational performance work IF WE WERE XYZ at Asia Society. In this new work, she explores dreams—both in the sense of the subconscious experiences we have while sleeping and the conscious aspirations we have when awake. Drawing upon Javanese mysticism, traditional beliefs, the artist’s own dreams documented in a self-devised sleep laboratory, and other sources, Suryodarmo’s intensive research process leads to a visceral and immediate three-hour performance.

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 Currencies of Imagination: Channeling Money and Chasing Mobility in Vietnam
Oct
17
12:00 PM12:00

Currencies of Imagination: Channeling Money and Chasing Mobility in Vietnam

  • Kahin Center, Cornell University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Remittances from the Vietnamese diaspora have played an important role in  Vietnam’s post Cold War economic development, providing important inputs to a range of  household spending areas, from education to health care. In the case of Vietnam, however, remittances are also caught up with memories and traumas of war, betrayal, separation and exodus. Conceptually examining remittances as money, but also gifts, this talk by Ivan V. Small (Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Central Connecticut State University) illustrates how Vietnam’s particular postwar refugee and remittance histories and channels exacerbate  inherent contradictions in the mobile flows of finance, people and goods across borders that define globalization.

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Melati Suryodarmo: Body as Container
Oct
15
6:30 PM18:30

Melati Suryodarmo: Body as Container

One of Asia’s most important performance artists, Melati Suryodarmo, has been creating powerful, immersive performance work for nearly 25 years. In this talk, she discusses her creative journey, philosophy, and artistic practice, shaped by multiple influences from traditional Javanese meditation to Japanese butoh to her study of performance art with Marina Abramović. She will be in conversation with Asia Society’s Vice President of Global Arts & Cultural Programs and Museum Director Boon Hui Tan.

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Gamelan Çudamani - An Evening of Balinese Music and Dance
Oct
6
7:30 PM19:30

Gamelan Çudamani - An Evening of Balinese Music and Dance

Gamelan Çudamani is a 24-member music and dance ensemble from Bali that weaves layers of intricate sound from deep bronze gongs to the delicate sounds of the flute in the Indonesian gamelan tradition. The group also performs dances such as the legong - one of the island’s most revered and demanding classical dances, historically seen only by the royal family. These talented young performers bring to life vivid tales of gods and heroes of Balinese mythology and history and explore the shifting dimensions of human emotion, nature, the spirit world, and the cosmos.

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Demonstration: Popular Music from Java - Keroncong
Oct
6
4:00 PM16:00

Demonstration: Popular Music from Java - Keroncong

  • Arthur M. Sackler Gallery (Level B1 Lobby) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Indonesian guest artists Danis Sugiyanto on violin and vocalist Endah Laras join the American keroncong band Rumput to demonstrate and discuss the traditional string band music of Indonesia and its connection to the arrival of Portuguese sailors and freed slaves to the archipelago in the sixteenth century.

These performances are part of “Performing Indonesia” and are presented in cooperation with the Embassy of Indonesia.

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20th Anniversary Screening: "Nang Nak"
Sep
27
7:00 PM19:00

20th Anniversary Screening: "Nang Nak"

  • Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Based on a famous Thai legend that has inspired movies since the silent era (not to mention plays, TV shows, comic books and even an opera), Nang Nak is, according to some, a true story illustrating the dangers of earthly attachments. It is so deeply rooted in Thai culture that to this day a shrine to its tragic heroine still exists in Bangkok. In it, a soldier goes to war, leaving behind his pregnant wife. After nearly dying in battle, he returns home to his wife and newborn son. The problem is, he’s the only one in town who doesn’t know they are both ghosts. Set in a lush jungle village, Nonzee Nimbutr’s elegant, hauntingly beautiful adaptation is the most acclaimed cinematic expression of this heartbreaking tale.

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Constructing an Asian Look: Beauty Ideals and Cosmetic Surgery in Malaysia
Sep
18
12:00 PM12:00

Constructing an Asian Look: Beauty Ideals and Cosmetic Surgery in Malaysia

  • Room 203, Luce Hall, Yale University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Council on Southeast Asia Studies at Yale’s Brown Bag Seminar Series presents “Constructing an Asian Look: Beauty Ideals and Cosmetic Surgery in Malaysia.“

About the Speaker: Alka Menon is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Yale University, where she is also a research fellow at the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies. Her research examines the effects of globalization and medical consumerism on physician authority and healthcare. Currently, she is working on a book project on cosmetic surgery in transnational perspective, focusing on the multiethnic cases of the U.S. and Malaysia. Her work has received support from the National Science Foundation and the Social Science Research Council. Alka received her PhD in Sociology from Northwestern University in 2018.

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Hmong Fugitive History and Refugee Epistemology
Sep
12
12:00 PM12:00

Hmong Fugitive History and Refugee Epistemology

  • Kahin Center, Cornell University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This talk examines the critical narratives of refugee migration and community formation from a Hmong epistemological perspective. By analyzing Hmong women’s narratives against U.S. redacted archival records that erase Hmong and Laos history during the U.S. “secret war,” the talk explores the politics of knowledge formation which has generated a historiography about the Hmong refugee as a masculinized refugee soldier and a distinct U.S. ally.

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The Voices of the Victims: The Rohingyas and their “Subhuman” Life
Sep
10
6:15 PM18:15

The Voices of the Victims: The Rohingyas and their “Subhuman” Life

  • International Affairs Building, Columbia University, Room 802 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Accounts gathered by Nasir Uddin from the Rohingyas living in Ukhia and Teknaf unfold the horrible ways they were dealt with as if they were lesser than human beings what Uddin terms “subhuman” life. This talk presents the first-hand narratives of the Rohingya refugees, the voices of the victims, in the broader spectrum of statelessness, refugeehood and human rights in the world.

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The Uncounted Dead of Duterte's Drug War: Talk by Sheila Coronel
Sep
10
12:30 PM12:30

The Uncounted Dead of Duterte's Drug War: Talk by Sheila Coronel

  • Rudin Forum for Civic Dialogue (NYU Wagner, 2nd Floor) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Huge numbers of deaths have gone uncounted in Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s drug war. What does that mean for due process, and for the countries that emulate him? 

Sheila Coronel is the Dean of Academic Affairs, Toni Stabile Professor of Professional Practice in Investigative Journalism and Director, Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism, at the Columbia School of Journalism. She co-founded the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism and has written and edited more than a dozen books on the Philippines, freedom of information and investigative journalism.

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Experience Thailand 2019
Sep
8
11:00 AM11:00

Experience Thailand 2019

Take a break for fun, flavor and friends at our annual Experience Thailand event!

We have invited fourteen of New York’s best Thai restaurants to take part of this event! Enjoy a variety of flavorful Thai food or grab a refreshing fresh coconut juice while enjoying many cultural activities and fun that we have prepared for you!

The cultural festival is free and open to the public from 11:00 am to 6:00 pm. In cooperation with the Thai community in New York, the festival will simulate an atmosphere of Thailand in the multicultural city of New York.

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Making Sense of Rural Asia: Three Puzzles, Two Problems and a Challenge
Sep
6
3:00 PM15:00

Making Sense of Rural Asia: Three Puzzles, Two Problems and a Challenge

In this talk, Johnathan Rigg from University of Bristol attempts to solve what he calls the "Three Puzzles, Two Problems and a Challenge” of rural Asia. He will bring together his recent research in Thailand and Vietnam and explain some of the challenges and problems by looking at rural living conditions, dis-intensification of farming, and the decrease in rural poverty in both countries, and the wider Asian region.

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 “Like a Sales Promotion Girl”: Cigarettes, Communities, and Social Media Marketing in Indonesia
Aug
29
12:00 PM12:00

“Like a Sales Promotion Girl”: Cigarettes, Communities, and Social Media Marketing in Indonesia

In Indonesia, cigarette companies get around marketing restrictions by contracting vendors and inducing influential youth to do promotional work for them, sometimes for free. Philip Morris International’s subsidiary Sampoerna aggressively promotes its machine-rolled clove cigarette brand A Mild, the bestselling cigarette in Indonesia, through live music shows, photography competitions, art exhibits, and even camping trips. Based on participation in these events, as well as interviews with participants, influencers, DJs, MCs, Sales Promotion Girls, and event organizers, Marina Welker analyzes how Sampoerna cultivates community groups that perform face-to-face and social media labor to service and extend the A Mild brand, which it associates with values and aesthetics that are conventionally coded as transgressive, activist, and anti-capitalist.

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Indonesia’s Religions and Their Contested Narratives
Aug
14
12:00 PM12:00

Indonesia’s Religions and Their Contested Narratives

  • The Puck Building, Mulberry Conference Room (Room 3072) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This presentation examines the contested place of religion in political and local narratives in Indonesia. At times, state and regional policies appear to legalize discrimination towards some religious communities. These policies, however, are often at odds with local traditions and more modern efforts aimed maintaining religious pluralism. Based on fieldwork in Java, Sulawesi and Maluku, this presentation argues that local efforts aimed at promoting religious pluralism, both on the ground and online, function as a reservoir of inter-faith understanding that supports national government efforts to maintain peace between religious communities.

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Call for Proposals: NYSEAN Partners Fund
May
31
12:00 AM00:00

Call for Proposals: NYSEAN Partners Fund

The mission of the New York Southeast Asia Network (NYSEAN) is to promote research on, and awareness of, Southeast Asia. Toward that end, NYSEAN has established the Partners Fund to foster collaboration among academics, artists, policymakers and other professionals working on contemporary Southeast Asia. To promote such cooperation, the NYSEAN Partners Fund is issuing a call for proposals aimed at funding conferences, small workshops, panel discussions, exhibitions, art installations or performances that address historical or contemporary issues in Southeast Asia and/or U.S.-Southeast Asia relations.

Proposals should be submitted to coordinator@nysean.org by May 31, 2019.

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The Rohingya Genocide: A Panel Discussion
May
21
6:30 PM18:30

The Rohingya Genocide: A Panel Discussion

  • Union Theological Seminary, James Chapel, 3041 Broadway New York, NY, 10027 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join us for an evening of presentation and discussion concerning the history and development of the Rohingya humanitarian tragedy in Myanmar and the resulting refugee crisis. The evening’s conversation will focus on the causes and conditions of the crisis along with the role that Buddhist laity and monastic communities have played in the rhetoric and violence. Led by an esteemed guest panel, this open discussion will hopefully bring a better understanding to the situation and identify compassionate ways of seeking justice and delivering relief to those who are suffering.

The panelists for the event are:

  • Khin Mai Aung, US Coordinator of the Free Rohingya Coalition

  • Dr. Azeem Ibrahim, Author of “The Rohingyas: Inside Myanmar's Hidden Genocide”

  • Adem Carroll, New York and UN Program Director of the Burma Task Force

  • Ashley Aye Aye Dun, Writer and Founder of Saddha: Buddhists For Peace

To register for the event, click here.

HOSTED BY:

  • The Buddhist Action Coalition

  • Buddhist Council of New York

  • The Union Thích Nhất Hạnh Program for Engaged Buddhism

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Southeast Asian Day of Resilience
May
11
5:00 PM17:00

Southeast Asian Day of Resilience

  • 2751 University Avenue NY, 10468 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In the spirit of April 30th, a diasporic Vietnamese day of remembrance, and April 17th, the Cambodian Genocide Remembrance Day, Mekong NYC is hosting a 2-part event centered around Southeast Asian resilience and healing. The first portion of the Southeast Asian Day of Resilience is an invite-only discussion featuring Southeast Asian (Vietnamese and Cambodian) community leaders and members, with a select group of Mekong NYC's allies invited to listen to and support this discussion. The second half of the event (from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm) is an open reception where Mekong and Southeast Asian artists will share our work, especially regarding how Southeast Asian people have pioneered amazing healing work for our diasporic community. We are proud to show the work of Khmer, Viet, and Lao artists: Amy Lee Sanford, LinDa Saphan, and Michelle Nguyễn Bounkousohn.

For more information, click here.

HOSTED BY:

  • Mekong NYC

  • Manhattan College

  • Fordham Bedford Housing Corporation

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Violence and Policing in the Philippines, Latin America, and the U.S.
Apr
22
to Apr 23

Violence and Policing in the Philippines, Latin America, and the U.S.

  • World Room, Pulitzer Hall, Columbia Journalism School (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

President Rodrigo Duterte came to power by promising a bloody war on drugs. Since he assumed office in July 2016, thousands of drug users and dealers have been killed in both police operations and murders by unknown assailants. Nearly all of these victims were poor Filipinos who lived in informal settlements in the country’s largest and most populous cities. The Philippine case is not unique. Echoes of the Philippine experience can be found worldwide.

This conference aims to bring together journalists and scholars who have explored the nexus between urban poverty, policing, and violence. It will explore how violence is woven into the fabric of policing strategies that have focused on the security and safety of the rich and the middle class, and on criminalizing the poor as thieves, drug addicts, and scoundrels. Seen in this light, the war on crime is but the latest expression of a decades-long war against the urban poor.

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Bridge to a Brighter Future: The Patani Malay-Thai Multilingual Education Programme
Feb
26
7:00 PM19:00

Bridge to a Brighter Future: The Patani Malay-Thai Multilingual Education Programme

Thailand has made great strides in education, achieving near 100% primary enrollment and a 98% youth literacy rate. Yet one third of ethnic minority teens are still illiterate in Thai, despite 6-8 years of schooling. The problem is most acute in the Deep South, among Patani Malay speaking youth. The Deep South is also the scene of a long-standing insurgency, pitting Patani Malay Muslim separatists against the Thai Buddhist state. Since 2004, over 7000 have died, including 180 teachers—some killed in front of their students—as the insurgency views the Thai education system as a threat to Islam and the Patani Malay language/culture.Since 2006, linguists from Mahidol University have cooperated with UNICEF Thailand and the Patani Malay community to pioneer mother tongue based multilingual education for children in grades K-6. The results have been overwhelmingly positive; the program received both the 2016 UNESCO King Sejong Literacy Award and the 2017 UNESCO Wenhui Award for Innovation in the Professional Development of Teachers (honorable commendation). This lecture will examine the structure of the programme, detail student and community assessment methods employed, and discuss the implications for education and peace building in Thailand and beyond. Full copies of UNICEF Thailand’s just-published project documentation (175 pages) will be available free of charge in limited quantities.


Speaker Bio

Kirk R. Person, Ph.D. (University of Texas, Arlington) came to Thailand in 1988 as a volunteer English teacher—and stayed! He works with SIL International, an NGO focused on minority language issues. He has conducted linguistic fieldwork in Thailand, Myanmar, and China (PRC), taught graduate linguistics courses at several Thai universities, represented SIL International to the Asia-Pacific Multilingual Education Working Group (hosted by UNESCO-Bangkok), served on the Royal Institute of Thailand’s National Language Policy Drafting Committee, and contributed to the British Academy’s language policy recommendations for Myanmar. 

Hosted by Columbia University Teacher’s College.


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Southeast Asia Spring Cultural Festival
Feb
15
5:30 PM17:30

Southeast Asia Spring Cultural Festival

  • 34 Hillhouse Avenue New Haven, CT, 06511 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Since spring of 2003, the faculty and students of the Yale Southeast Asia Language Studies Programs have organized and hosted an annual “Cultural Festival,” featuring displays and performances of regional arts, crafts, music, and dance, along with a buffet dinner of Southeast Asian cuisine. The festival evenings have been open to the University and the public, and each year have attracted enthusiastic crowds of Yale students, faculty, and community participants.

Past festivals have featured Yale student and local community groups presenting songs, dances, fashion shows, photograph collections, and traditional crafts from the Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Laos and Cambodia, and the Yale Gamelan Suprabanggo has provided small and large group performances. Festivals have also occasionally featured guest performers such as the Nguyen Dinh Nghia Family Ensemble playing traditional Vietnamese instruments, the Gamelan Dharma Swara and Balinese Dance Troupe from the Indonesian Consulate in New York, and the Amnaj Jatuprayoon Dance Troupe of NYC performing the Ramakien Thai Ramayana.

For more information, click here

Hosted by Council on Southeast Asian Studies.

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Toilets and Cities: From NYC to Phnom Penh
Nov
19
2:00 PM14:00

Toilets and Cities: From NYC to Phnom Penh

  • 295 Lafayette Street New York, NY United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Spend your World Toilet Day listening to professionals in the sanitation space talk about urban toilets from both a domestic and international lens. You will have the opportunity to sit down with sanitation experts and discuss their work and outlook on urban sanitation - from access and human rights to urban planning and finance. Speakers will come from city government, international NGOs, academia, and multilateral agencies. 

Similar to speed dating, you will have the opportunity to change tables every 10-15 minutes, allowing you to speak personally to multiple panelists and gain a deeper understanding of the global sanitation challenges in urban settings.

Find more information here.

Hosted by NYU Wagner's International Public Service Association, NYU Stern's Social Impact and Sustainability Association, and FLUSH LLC.

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LaoNow2018: Celebrating Fashion, Food, and Film from the Laotian American Community
Oct
13
8:30 AM08:30

LaoNow2018: Celebrating Fashion, Food, and Film from the Laotian American Community

  • Regis High School 55 E 84th St.​ and Wallace Hall at St. Ignatius 980 Park Ave. (at 84th St) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

LaoNow 2018 is this year’s premiere national Laotian American community gathering, featuring inspiring designers, filmmakers, storytellers, and chefs. This all-day event will bring together 350 community members to connect and celebrate our community’s shared heritage and our creative evolution, while supporting a brighter future for the next generation in Laos. 

Find more information and tickets here.

Hosted by Legacies of War.

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Singapore Unbound Book Reading
Jun
9
7:00 PM19:00

Singapore Unbound Book Reading

Jason Wee is an artist and a writer working between contemporary art, architecture, poetry and photography. His art practice contends with sources of singular authority in favour of polyphony and difference. He transforms these histories and spaces into various visual and written materials. He founded and runs Grey Projects, an artists’ space, library and residency in Singapore and Berlin. He is an editor for Softblow poetry journal, and the author of the essay chapbook My Suit and the poetry collection The Monsters Between Us (Math Paper Press).

Jason will read from We Contain Multitudes (Singapore: Epigram Books), which he co-edited. The anthology celebrates 12 years of the Anglophone poetry journal Softblow, and includes poems by Singaporeans such as Boey Kim Cheng, Christine Chia, Tania De Rozario, Joshua Ip, Pooja Nansi, Ng Yi-Sheng, and Arthur Yap; and international voices such as Sherman Alexie, Ingrid de Kok, Kristine Ong Muslim, Mariko Nagai, Murat Nemet-Nejat, Alicia Suskin Ostriker, Laksmi Pamuntjak, Simon Perchik, Marge Piercy, Jeet Thayil, and Ocean Vuong. Jason will also read from his forthcoming book An Epic of Durable Departures (Math Paper Press).

Loo Zihan is an artist from Singapore working at the intersections of critical theory, performance, and the moving-image. His work emphasises the malleability of memory through various representational strategies that include performance re-enactments, essay films and data visualisation. His research includes the erotiohistoriographical potential of archives and queer bondage. His performances have been presented at the Singapore International Festival of Arts and the Brisbane Festival. He was awarded the Young Artist Award by the National Arts Council of Singapore in 2015. 

Zihan will speak about his installation "Queer Objects: an archive for the future." To assemble a hypothetical Singaporean queer archive, Zihan reached out to artists, theatre companies, queer-friendly faith groups, civil society organisations and personal friends. During the collection process, he encouraged the inclusion of objects that each contributor associated with their journey of queer identification. The final selection of 81 objects showcased the spectrum of queer experiences.

After their presentations, Jason and Zihan will engage in a conversation about "Queer Objects" and other queer stuff about Singapore. There is a very short open mike before their talks. RSVP Jee at jkoh@singaporeunbound.org for directions. Let him know what dish you'd like to bring for the potluck and whether you'd like to read for the open mike.

Hosted by Singapore Unbound.

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Vietnamese Les (Lesbian) Gender, Community, and Space in the Phantasmagoria of Real Life
Apr
26
12:00 PM12:00

Vietnamese Les (Lesbian) Gender, Community, and Space in the Phantasmagoria of Real Life

  • Yale University - Luce Hall, Room 203 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Based upon ethnographic research since 2006, recorded interviews, and video-analysis, this presentation will analyze how les appropriate a popular and heteronormatively themed Vietnamese short story to tell a liberalized parable of les romance in the context of tình nghĩa vợ chồng, a traditional value system that shapes love and long-term commitment between married couples.

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Vietnam: Today and Yesterday
Apr
6
9:30 PM21:30

Vietnam: Today and Yesterday

  • Rutger's University Alexander Library (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Jack Yeager, from Lousiana State University (Baton Rouge), speaks on 'Metissage and "Queer" Spaes of Interrogation in Marguerite Duras, Kim Lefevre and Linda Le.'

Leslie Barnes, from Australian National University, speaks on 'Market Demands, Migratory Flows: Married Women in Colonial Vietnam and the Diaspora.'

Nora Annesley Taylor, from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, speaks on 'The Document as Event: Vietnamese Artists' Engagements with History.'

This event is sponsored by the Department of French and the Program in Comparative LIterature in the Rutgers School of Arts and Science.

Hosted by Rutger’s University.

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Malay Sketches Release Event
Apr
5
7:00 PM19:00

Malay Sketches Release Event

Singapore Unbound Fellowship winner Nur Sabrina binte Dzulkifli and Singapore-based playwright Joel Tan join award-winning author Gina Apostol and publisher Jee Leong Koh to read from Alfian Sa'at's MALAY SKETCHES, and speak about why these stories about the Malay Muslim community in Singapore matter. Reception with Singapore food follows.

Hosted by Singapore Unbound.

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