Filtering by: Politics
Disinformation and Elections In East And Southeast Asia: Digital Futures And Fragile Democracies
Oct
3
to Oct 4

Disinformation and Elections In East And Southeast Asia: Digital Futures And Fragile Democracies

  • 420 West 118th Street New York, NY, 10027 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

DISINFORMATION AND ELECTIONS IN EAST AND SOUTHEAST ASIA: DIGITAL FUTURES AND FRAGILE DEMOCRACIES

WEATHERHEAD EAST ASIAN INSTITUTE 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY - 70th ANNIVERSARY SERIES

New York City October 3-4, 2019

Co-sponsored by the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, the Columbia Journalism School, and the New York Southeast Asia Network

 

CO-ORGANISERS

- Sheila Coronel, Columbia Journalism School

- Duncan McCargo, Department of Political Science, Columbia University

- Jonathan Corpus Ong, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

- Margaret Scott, New York University

OVERVIEW

A recent series of elections in Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines and indeed across Asia has highlighted the salience of digital media in political campaigns and insidious modes of electoral manipulation. This two-day workshop aims to gather evidence into the operations and impact of digital disinformation in the context of recent Asian elections. The conference approaches Asia as a site in which disinformation in various digital and analog forms have not only deep local histories but also radical acceleration and innovation the likes of which have little to no precedent in advanced liberal democracies in the West. Many Asian countries lead in both scale and intensity of technological adoption and use while serving as “laboratories” for testing and experimentation by Big Tech firms, with minimal oversight and accountability to the potentially grave consequences of algorithmic tweaks, the dispersed labor of content moderation, and new platform rollouts. Thus we seek to develop a framework that examines the social and political ramifications of this process beyond the region.

The two-day event aims for interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches to thinking through issues of disinformation that draw from areas of sociology, politics, media and communication studies, journalism studies, critical legal studies, information science, and anthropology.

The format will consist of workshop sessions open to the public organized around four main themes:

1) Elections and Disinformation 

2) Winning the Digital War: The Transformation of Political Campaigns 

3) Digital Populisms and Constructions of 'the Other'

4)Confronting Facebook: Platform Regulation, Information Control, and Local Interventions.

In addition, the event will include an open, public evening session to which members of the New York and national journalism and policy communities will be invited.

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Call for Proposals: NYSEAN Partners Fund
May
31
12:00 AM00:00

Call for Proposals: NYSEAN Partners Fund

The mission of the New York Southeast Asia Network (NYSEAN) is to promote research on, and awareness of, Southeast Asia. Toward that end, NYSEAN has established the Partners Fund to foster collaboration among academics, artists, policymakers and other professionals working on contemporary Southeast Asia. To promote such cooperation, the NYSEAN Partners Fund is issuing a call for proposals aimed at funding conferences, small workshops, panel discussions, exhibitions, art installations or performances that address historical or contemporary issues in Southeast Asia and/or U.S.-Southeast Asia relations.

Proposals should be submitted to coordinator@nysean.org by May 31, 2019.

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Islamist Agenda in Indonesia Beyond 2019
May
16
12:00 PM12:00

Islamist Agenda in Indonesia Beyond 2019

  • The Puck Building, 295 Lafayette Street, Mulberry Conference Room (Room 3072), 3rd Floor New York City, NY 10012 United States of America (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A fragile alliance of Islamist groups known as the "212 Movement" that first emerged in 2016 has managed to sustain its mobilizing power by using Prabowo, the rival of incumbent candidate Joko Widodo, as a rallying point during the campaign leading up to the April 17 election. Now that Prabowo is the presumed loser, what will happen to the Islamists? Is a Jokowi win really a victory for pluralist democracy?

Nava Nuraniyah has been an analyst at the Jakarta-based Institute for Policy Analysis of Conflict (IPAC) since 2015, and her research interests include the role of Islam in politics as well as the evolution of extremism in South East Asia, including the role of women. Before joining IPAC, she worked as a researcher on terrorism and radicalization in Indonesia at the Centre of Excellence for National Security, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Singapore.

For more information, click here.

HOSTED BY:

  • NYSEAN

  • Race to Istana

  • Wagner's Office of International Programs

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Trump’s Indo-Pacific Strategy & the ASEAN and Chinese Responses
Apr
29
4:00 PM16:00

Trump’s Indo-Pacific Strategy & the ASEAN and Chinese Responses

The Trump administration has articulated a ‘free and open Indo-Pacific’ strategy as the new modus operandi for the United States's policy on Asia, but is it a useful organizing concept? Please join Dr. Amy Searight, Senior Advisor and Director of the Southeast Asia Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, for a discussion of the Trump administration’s ‘free and open Indo-Pacific” and the Southeast Asian response. Dr. Andrew Nathan will provide a Chinese view of the ‘free and open Indo-Pacific” strategy in promises to be a stimulating discussion of an important topic. Acting as the moderator for the event will be Dr. Ann Marie Murphy of Seton Hall University. 

Hosted by: 

  • NYSEAN

  • Columbia Weatherhead East Asian Institute

Amy Searight poster-1.png
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Indigenous Rights Defenders Under Attack: Challenges and Responses
Apr
25
7:00 PM19:00

Indigenous Rights Defenders Under Attack: Challenges and Responses

  • The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Human Rights Defenders and Indigenous Peoples are increasingly under attack worldwide. This convergence of threats was recognized by a report last year from the UN Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Peoples. That report highlighted how intensified competition over natural resources -- led by private companies and at times with government complicity -- has placed indigenous communities seeking to protect their traditional lands at the forefront as targets of persecution.

This panel features perspectives from the Americas, Asia, and Africa on the nature of these threats against indigenous rights defenders and the responses these organizations and their allies are taking to ensure the security of indigenous rights defenders and advancing efforts to defend the lands, resources, and rights of indigenous communities.

A reception will follow the panel discussion.

Panelists:

Antenor Vaz, a former senior official at FUNAI, the federal agency responsible for Brazil's indigenous peoples, and an author of a recent report on the situation of voluntary isolated tribes in the Amazon.

Nidia Becerra, has been elected leader of the Inga three times. Nidia works with the Yunguillo, a reserve in the department of Putumayo, in the Colombian Amazon, to achieve the protection of its territory. Under her leadership, she has quintupled the amount of formally protected traditional Inga land. She also coordinates Land is Life’s Indigenous-Led Grantmaking initiative throughout the Amazon.

Daniel Kobei, Founder and Executive Director of Ogiek Peoples’ Development Program, a Kenyan-based NGO working to secure human and land rights of the indigenous Ogiek community and other Indigenous Peoples across Kenya and Africa.

Aisah Czarriane Mariano is Deputy Secretary General of the Cordillera Peoples’ Alliance, a federation of peoples organizations in the Cordillera region of the Philippines.

Relmu Ñanku is a Mapuche leader from Argentina.

Moderator: John Gershman, Clinical Professor of Public Service, Wagner Graduate School of Public Service

For more information, click here

Hosted by: 

  • NYSEAN

  • Wagner's Office of International Programs

  • Land is Life

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Policing the Poor in the World's Cities: Perspectives from the Philippines and Latin America
Apr
24
6:00 PM18:00

Policing the Poor in the World's Cities: Perspectives from the Philippines and Latin America

  • 40 Washington Square South New York, NY, 10012 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This panel aims to explore the nexus between urban poverty, policing, and violence. It will explore how violence is woven into the fabric of policing strategies that have focused on the security and safety of the rich and the middle class, and on criminalizing the poor as thieves, drug addicts, and scoundrels. Seen in this light, the war on crime is but the latest expression of a decades-long war against the urban poor.

Speakers: 

- Mary Racelis, The Long Struggle for Rights in the City: Perspectives from the Philippines

- Ronald Mendoza, Using News Reports to Estimate Drug Casualties in the Philippines

- Bruno Paes Manzo, Citizen Security and Homicides in Brazil: Patterns and Variations

- Ronna Risquez, Police Violence and Death Squads in Venezuela

For more information and to register for this event, click here

Hosted by: 

  • NYSEAN

  • Columbia Journalism School

  • NYU Wagner Graduate School of Public Service

  • NYU Center for Latin and Caribbean Studies

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Violence and Policing in the Philippines, Latin America, and the U.S.
Apr
22
9:00 AM09:00

Violence and Policing in the Philippines, Latin America, and the U.S.

President Rodrigo Duterte came to power by promising a bloody war on drugs. Since he assumed office in July 2016, thousands of drug users and dealers have been killed in both police operations and murders by unknown assailants. Nearly all of these victims were poor Filipinos who lived in informal settlements in the country’s largest and most populous cities.

This frenzy of violence is rooted in wider and older forms of violence and injustice: poverty, segregation, and systematic violence against urban poor communities, such as forced evictions and police saturation drives. It is also enmeshed in the growing polarization of Philippine cities.

The Philippine case is not unique. Echoes of the Philippine experience can be found worldwide. This conference aims to bring together journalists and scholars who have explored the nexus between urban poverty, policing, and violence. It will explore how violence is woven into the fabric of policing strategies that have focused on the security and safety of the rich and the middle class, and on criminalizing the poor as thieves, drug addicts, and scoundrels. Seen in this light, the war on crime is but the latest expression of a decades-long war against the urban poor.

To register for this event, click here

Hosted by: 

  • NYSEAN

  • Columbia Journalism School

  • NYU Wagner Graduate School of Public Service

  • NYU Center for Latin and Caribbean Studies

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Time and Kinship: Rebirth and Being in Burmese Buddhist Cosmology
Apr
18
12:00 PM12:00

Time and Kinship: Rebirth and Being in Burmese Buddhist Cosmology

  • 420 West 118th Street New York, NY, 10027 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Burmese Buddhists tell rebirth stories to explain where they came from and will go, from previous life to the next in the cycle of rebirth. The ultimate goal of their existence is not for the cycle to continue but to end, so as to attain nirvana. The Western modernist assumption of linear endlessly progressing time embedded in standard models of kinship in anthropology needs to be withdrawn to take into account the Burmese Buddhist experience and practice of kinship, with its multiple concepts of time and multiple paths through which relatedness by blood and water unfold along cycles of rebirth. The Burmese case invites an anthropological inquiry into the concept of time, and offers a critique of, and alternative to, the Western idea of teleological progress.

Please join us for a seminar featuring Naoko Kumada, a research fellow at the School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, and moderated by Zhaohua Yang, the Sheng Yen Assistant Professor of Chinese Buddhism at the Columbia Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. No registration is required for the event. 

For more information, click here

Hosted by: 

  • Columbia Weatherhead East Asian Institute

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Indonesia’s Presidential Election and Political Islam
Apr
15
12:00 PM12:00

Indonesia’s Presidential Election and Political Islam

  • 420 West 118th Street New York, NY, 10027 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join Sidney Jones, the executive director of the Jakarta-based Institute for Policy Analysis of Conflict (IPAC), for a timely conversation about Indonesia’s presidential election - which will take place on April 17 - and the role of religion in the politics of the world's largest Muslim-majority nation. Margaret Scott, one of NYSEAN’s founders and a journalist who writes about Indonesia, will moderate the conversation.

Before setting up IPAC, Jones worked from 2002 to 2013 with the International Crisis Group, first as Southeast Asia project director, then from 2007 as senior adviser to the Asia program. Before joining Crisis Group, she worked for the Ford Foundation in Jakarta and New York (1977-84); Amnesty International in London as the Indonesia-Philippines-Pacific researcher (1985-88); and Human Rights Watch in New York as the Asia director (1989-2002). She holds a B.A. and M.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. She lived in Shiraz, Iran for one year as a university student, 1971-72, and studied Arabic in Cairo and Tunisia. She received an honorary doctorate in 2006 from the New School in New York.

Hosted by: 

  • NYSEAN

  • Weatherhead East Asian Institute at Columbia University

  • NYU Wagner's Office of International Programs

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On Rising Fear, Anxiety, and Producing the “Other” in Indonesia
Apr
13
8:30 AM08:30

On Rising Fear, Anxiety, and Producing the “Other” in Indonesia

The Northeastern Conference (NEC) on Indonesia is an initiative of the Yale Indonesia Forum (YIF) and the Cornell Indonesia Student Association (CIA). The 19th Northeastern Conference in New Haven is organized by the Yale Indonesia Forum and funded by the Council on Southeast Asia Studies (CSEAS) at Yale University.

The Yale Indonesia Forum (YIF) seeks to address the issues of rising fear and anxiety, marginalization, and otherization in Indonesia from diverse disciplinary and methodological perspectives. How have categories of proper Indonesianness been historically constructed, and whom have they excluded? What are the historic and contemporary sources of societal anxiety in Indonesia? What new opportunities for and challenges to mutual understanding have emerged since the rise of human rights discourses? Are there clear victim-perpetrator binaries when it comes to otherization, and in what ways do targets of marginalization stake their claims to belonging? Can we predict what social categories will be the next targets?

Theme

In the throes of Jakarta’s gubernatorial election campaign of 2017, mass opposition arose against then-governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, popularly known as Ahok, for his alleged blasphemy against the Quran. Ahok’s subsequent election loss and arrest carried uncomfortable echoes of the past. The animosity directed towards the Christian and ethnically Chinese governor sparked fears that Indonesia’s ethnic and social tensions were dangerously resurgent.  Indeed, the creation of a distinct “Other” against whom to direct societal anxieties has taken various forms in Indonesia, including the portrayal of the ethnic Chinese as unscrupulous opportunists, the depiction of communism as the source of all social ills, and more recently, the panic over LGBT populations being a supposed source of moral decay. 

For more information, click here

Hosted by: 

  • Yale Indonesia Forum

  • Cornell Indonesia Student Association

  • Yale Council On Southeast Asia Studies

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Religious Pluralism in Indonesia
Apr
12
to Apr 13

Religious Pluralism in Indonesia

The last twenty years have seen Indonesia navigate the rocky waters of post-authoritarian democratic rule, a.k.a. reformasi. This conference seeks to address the state of religious pluralism in the post-Suharto era (1965-1998) with case-studies from across the religious spectrum. Is the Pancasila framework working? Who’s driving the movement for inclusivist practices? And conversely, who is leading exclusivism? What is the relationship between “civil society groups” and the state? How have minorities fared so far? What challenges are they facing? These are some of the questions panelists will be attempting to answer, so to offer a multi-disciplinary perspective on the issue of religious pluralism in Indonesia. Although focused on Indonesia’s own particular realities, this workshop will be of interest to the wider scholarly community at Cornell, as we’ll touch upon issues at the core of the question of how state, citizens and organized civil society interact on the field of religious in/tolerance.

For more information, click here

Hosted by: 

  • Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies's Southeast Asia Program

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Indonesian Speaker Series: Sri Mulyani Indrawati and Gita Wirjawan
Apr
9
2:00 PM14:00

Indonesian Speaker Series: Sri Mulyani Indrawati and Gita Wirjawan

  • Lerner Building, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Indonesian Speakers Series provides opportunities for Indonesian students and the wider community to engage with inspiring leaders. For this event, we will welcome the current Indonesian Minister of Finance, Sri Mulyani Indrawati, and the former Indonesian Minister of Trade, Gita Wirjawan. 

About our Speakers:

Sri Mulyani Indrawati

Sri Mulyani Indrawati is an Indonesian economist who has been Minister of Finance of Indonesia since 2016; previously she served in the same post from 2005 to 2010. In June 2010 she was appointed as Managing Director of the World Bank Group and resigned as Minister of Finance.

Gita Wirjawan

Gita Irawan Wirjawan is an Indonesian entrepreneur, investment banker and philanthropist. Previously he served as Minister of Trade of the Republic of Indonesia during President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono’s Kabinet Indonesia Bersatu II. He is the founder of Ancora Group and Ancora Foundation.

To RSVP for Sri Mulyani's event, click here. [4PM-6PM]

To RSVP for Gita Wirjawan's event, click here. [2PM-4PM]

Hosted by: 

  • Permias NYC

  • NYU Indonesian Student Association

  • KJRI New York

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Development of Singapore's Economy
Apr
8
1:00 PM13:00

Development of Singapore's Economy

  • International Affairs Building Room 918 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

SEASI is proud to host professor Shengwu Li, Assistant Professor of economics at Harvard University, as he shares his thoughts on the topic of Singapore's economic development. At Harvard, Professor Li studied game theory and behavioral economics. He spent his undergraduate years at Oxford University studying philosophy, politics, and economics and earned his Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University. Dr. Li is the grandson of Singapore's founder, Lee Kuan Yew. 

This event is restricted to SIPA students, so please bring your student ID card. Registration is highly recommended since respondents will be prioritized. 

In order to register, click here

Hosted by: 

  • Columbia Southeast Asian Students Initative

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Making Autonomy Real? What's Happening with the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao in the Philippines
Apr
4
12:00 PM12:00

Making Autonomy Real? What's Happening with the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao in the Philippines

Join independent analyst and consultant David Timberman -- coming straight from the region -- for a conversation about current developments in the creation of the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (BARMM). 

With a plebiscite earlier this year, the creation of the BARMM took its final steps and the official inauguration of the Bangsamoro Transition Authority is imminent. The BARMM replaces the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao, a previous effort at negotiating autonomy between the Philippine government and the Moro National Liberation Front, which was widely viewed as a failure. The establishment of the BARMM represents the outcome of decades of negotiations and faces significant challenges for security, governance, and development.

David Timberman is an independent scholar and development practitioner who has addressed the challenges of democratic politics and governance in Southeast Asia for over thirty years.

For more information and to register for the event, click here

Hosted by: 

  • Wagner's Office of International Programs

  • NYSEAN

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Vietnam’s Relations with China: Domestic impact and international implications
Apr
3
12:00 PM12:00

Vietnam’s Relations with China: Domestic impact and international implications

The speaker for this Brown Bag Seminar is Ngo Vinh Long, who is a professor of Asian Studies in the History Department at the University of Maine. He has been teaching courses on China, Japan, South Asia, Southeast Asia and Vietnam at this university since 1985. His areas of interest include social and economic development in Asia and US relations with Asian countries. He is the author four books and over three hundred articles in various languages. He was a co-founder of the Committee of Asian Concerned Asian Scholars and its Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars in 1968, renamed Critical Asian Studies in 2000. He has travelled to Vietnam almost every year since 1986 to do research and to work with various academic institutions and non-governmental organizations there.

Hosted by: 

  • Yale Council On Southeast Asia Studies

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The South China Sea: US Foreign Policy Challenges and Geo-Political Impacts
Mar
29
6:00 PM18:00

The South China Sea: US Foreign Policy Challenges and Geo-Political Impacts

Conflict in the The South China Sea has become one of the most significant geopolitical concerns of the 21 century. It is estimated that that $5.3 trillion worth of goods moves through the South China Sea annually, 1.2 trillion of which is with the US. Around forty percent of global liquefied natural gas trade moves through the South China Sea. Any military conflict there would cripple critical global supply chains. In recent years, China has undertaken efforts to reclaim thousands of square feet in the South China Sea. Its construction of artificial islands and infrastructure such as  runways, support buildings, loading piers, and possible satellite communication antennas has prompted its neighbors and the US to question China’s motives. The US Navy sends ships into the South China Sea to counter what Washington sees as Beijing’s efforts to limit freedom of navigation in the strategic waters, where Chinese, Japanese, and some Southeast Asian navies operate. The slightest miscalculation could have dire consequences not just for Sino-US relations but also have implications for the region.

Can there be a “win win” situation in the South China Sea? What are China’s ultimate objectives? What should the US’s strategic goals be? How should the US and other countries within the region avoid conflict and instead foster a greater sense of trust and enhance cooperation in the South China Sea?

Moderator: Earl Carr, Adjunct Instructor, NYUSPS Center for Global Affairs; Managing Director, Momentum Advisors

Panelists:

Kimball Chen, Chairman, The Global LPG Partnership; Chairman, Energy Transportation Group, Inc.

Rorry Daniels, Deputy Project Director, Forum on Asia-Pacific Security, National Committee on American Foreign Policy

Brigadier General S. Clinton Hinote, Deputy Director, Air Force Warfighting Integration Capability; Deputy Chief of Staff for Strategic Plans and Requirements, Headquarters U.S. Air Force

Li Qingsi, Professor for International Relations, School of International Studies, Renmin University

To register, click here

Hosted by: 

  • NYUSPS Center for Global Affairs

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Democracy for Sale: Elections, Clientelism, and the State in Indonesia
Mar
25
12:00 PM12:00

Democracy for Sale: Elections, Clientelism, and the State in Indonesia

  • The Puck Building Mulberry Conference Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Edward Aspinall and Ward Berenschot discuss their new book on Indonesia, which delves into the ways in which Indonesia's elections, and its political system writ large, have become dominated by clientelism - meaning that politicians exchange material benefits, such as cash, jobs, goods, and contracts, for political support. Based on years of fieldwork, they provide new insights into how this form of politics has become so dominant in Indonesia, and what is distinctive about the Indonesian version of clientelism. 

The Authors

Edward Aspinall is a researcher at the Australian National University in Canberra. He has authored or edited over a dozen books on Indonesian and Southeast Asian politics, including Opposing Suharto (2005) and Islam and Rebellion (2009). 

Ward Berenschot is a researcher at the Royal Netherlands Institute for Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV) where he specialises in local democracy, clientelism and identity politics in India and Indonesia. He is the author of Riot Politics (2011). 

Hosted by Office of International Programs at NYU Wagner, NYSEAN, and Race to Istana.

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Conformities and Interruptions in Southeast Asia - Cornell Southeast Asia Program's 21st Graduate Student Conference
Mar
8
to Mar 10

Conformities and Interruptions in Southeast Asia - Cornell Southeast Asia Program's 21st Graduate Student Conference

  • Kahin Center for Advanced Research on Southeast Asia (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Conformities allude to laws, guidelines, and systems of political, cultural, and economic power that govern the lives of individuals and communities. What evident or overlooked conformities exist in the histories and contemporary issues of Southeast Asia? Conversely, the concept of interruptions offers a means to uncover non-conformities — individual and collective acts that subvert expectations. What systems or perspectives are challenged via processes of interruption? In Southeast Asian contexts interruptions might occur through performative or bodily acts, disturbances of socio-cultural boundaries, or subtle variations in physical and spatial environments. Yet, conformity and interruption can speak at multiple levels, from interpersonal to international and within/across collectives that don't adhere to national boundaries. What do moments of interruption reveal about conformity? Do they always undermine each other? Or can they be paired as tactics of intervention? Finally, what conformities might be present in the various disciplinary studies of Southeast Asia, and how can they be interrupted? The conference will be held March 8-10, 2019 at the Kahin Center for Advanced Research on Southeast Asia in Ithaca, New York.

Find more information here

Hosted by Cornell University Southeast Asia Program.


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Disinformation Crisis and Southeast Asian Elections: Behind the Scenes of Fake News Production and Fact-Check Interventions
Mar
5
5:00 PM17:00

Disinformation Crisis and Southeast Asian Elections: Behind the Scenes of Fake News Production and Fact-Check Interventions

  • Columbia University International Affairs Building Rm. 918 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This talk explores the everyday digital labor of fake news production and the fact-check interventions that attempt to combat the disinformation crisis particularly in Southeast Asia. Drawing from the study "Architects of Networked Disinformation" which focused on the work arrangements and moral justifications of disinformation producers in the Philippines, the focus of the talk is to move beyond naming and shaming exceptional villain influencers to identify the vulnerabilities in both political and media ecosystems that make political trolling a lucrative sideline gig for elite strategists as well as precarious creative workers. The talk also identifies current challenges facing election integrity interventions and country-specific legislation against fake news in light of forthcoming elections in Indonesia and the Philippines. I reflect on Facebook's new investments supporting fact-check partners and content moderators in the region, which on one hand offer possibilities for culturally appropriate local response but on the other hand create incentive structures that once again target low-hanging fruits and not the real masterminds of fake news.

About the Speaker:

Jonathan Corpus Ong (PhD, Cambridge) is Associate Professor of Global Digital Media in the Department of Communication, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, USA. He is the Co-Editor-in-Chief of the journal Television and New Media. He is co-author of the public report "Architects of Networked Disinformation: Behind the Scenes of Troll Accounts and Fake News Production in the Philippines", funded by the British Council. He is currently project leader of "Reality Check"–an election integrity project that promotes voter literacy around disinformation for the May 2019 Philippine midterm elections.  

Moderated by:

Sheila Coronel, Toni Stabile Professor of Professional Practice in Investigative Journalism, Dean of Academic Affairs, Columbia Journalism School.

Pizza will be provided!

Hosted by NYSEAN, Columbia Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia Journalism School, and Southeast Asian Students Initiative at Columbia University.

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The Cleaners, A Film by Moritz Riesewieck and Hans Block
Feb
25
6:00 PM18:00

The Cleaners, A Film by Moritz Riesewieck and Hans Block

  • 34 Hillhouse Avenue New Haven, CT, 06511 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Explore the shadow industry of "content moderators" hired by Silicon Valley in "The Cleaners," a documentary directed by Moritz Riesewieck and Hans Block. 

Young people in the city of Manila are paid to sift through and remove what they deem to be inappropriate content on the internet, moderating thousands upon thousands of troubling images and videos during the course of a ten-hour shift. In a parallel struggle, the directors met people around the globe whose lives are dramatically affected by online censorship. 

Evolving from a shared vision of a global village to a dangerous web of fake news, extremism and radicalization, the film charts the rise and fall of social media's utopian ideology. 

For more information, click here

Hosted by Yale MacMillan Center and the Council on Southeast Asia Studies.

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The State of Human Rights in Southeast Asia
Feb
21
1:00 PM13:00

The State of Human Rights in Southeast Asia

  • Columbia University International Affairs Building Rm. 918 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The human rights situation is worsening in Southeast Asia, as seen in developments ranging from state-sponsored ethnic cleansing in Myanmar, to Duterte's drug war in the Philippines, as well as the continued harassment of religious minorities in Indonesia. Join NYSEAN for a panel discussion with experts from Human Rights Watch and the Yale Law School as they give their assessments of the current state of human rights in the region.  

Speakers:

Katherine Munyan, Allard K. Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic, Yale University. 

Phil Robertson, Deputy Director, Asia's Division Deputy Director, Human Rights Watch

Andreas Harsono, Indonesia Researcher, Human Rights Watch

Carlos Conde, Philippines Researcher, Human Rights Watch

Moderated by:

Margaret Scott, Adjunct Associate Professor, NYU Wagner School of Public Service

Hosted by NYSEAN, Columbia Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia Weatherhead East Asian Institute, and Southeast Asian Students Initiative at Columbia University.

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Islam, Identity and Populism in Indonesia
Feb
19
12:00 PM12:00

Islam, Identity and Populism in Indonesia

Andreas Harsono, Researcher at Human Rights Watch, will discuss the role of Islam, identity, and populism in the 2019 presidential campaign season in Indonesia. This discussion will also preview his upcoming book, “Race, Islam, and Power: Ethnic and Religious Violence in Post-Suharto Indonesia.”

Andreas Harsono is a long-time Indonesian media freedom advocate, who helped establish the Alliance of Independent Journalists, the Institute for the Studies on Free Flow of Information, and the Pantau Foundation, as well as the South East Asia Press Alliance (Bangkok), and since 2008 has been a researcher for Human Rights Watch covering Indonesia.

Register here.

Hosted by Center for Global Affairs,Center for Human Rights and Global Justice, Bernstein Institute for Human Rights, Masters program in International Relations, Wagner's Office of International Programs, NYSEAN, and Race to Istana.


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The Rohingya: Statelessness, Refugeehood and a ‘Subhuman’ Life, by Nasir Uddin
Feb
11
12:15 PM12:15

The Rohingya: Statelessness, Refugeehood and a ‘Subhuman’ Life, by Nasir Uddin

The Rohingyas, an ethno-linguistic and religious minority of Myanmar known as the most persecuted people in the world, experienced a brutal atrocity in 2017 perpetrated by Myanmar security forces and vigilantes what the United Nations Human Rights Council explained as “a textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” Following an attack made by the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) on August 25, 2017, Myanmar security forces launched a clearance operation, which, a report of a three-member-panel appointed by the United Nations confirms, forced 725,000 Rohingyas to flee to Bangladesh, about 10,000 Rohingyas were killed in the first two months, hundreds of women and girls were (gang) raped, and 392 villages were partially or totally destroyed. Along with the previous ones, Bangladesh now hosts 1.3 million Rohingya in its Southeastern part, Ukhia and Teknaf. The locals are becoming ‘unwelcoming’ since 1.3 million additional people have begun to share local resources, livelihood sources, and social utilities. In Myanmar, if we considering the intensity of atrocity committed by the state forces, the ways the Rohingyas have been dealt with as if they are not human beings. Now, the Rohingyas are ‘struggling for existence’ in Bangladesh having an obscured past, critical present and an uncertain future. The Rohingyas belong to no state as Myanmar stripped of their citizenship four decades ago and Bangladesh does not recognize them even as refugees. Given the context, the talk with empirically grounded evidences presents the current states of Rohingya in the Borderland of Bangladesh and Myanmar within the broader spectrum of statelessness, refugeehood and “subhuman life”.  

Nasir Uddin is a cultural anthropologist based in Bangladesh, and Professor of Anthropology at Chittagong University. Currently, he is working as a Research Consultant with the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at SOAS, University of London. 

Find more information here.

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THE RAID: REDEMPTION | NYAFF Winter Showcase
Feb
10
6:00 PM18:00

THE RAID: REDEMPTION | NYAFF Winter Showcase

Gareth Evans and Iko Uwais followed their breakthrough Merantau with this turbocharged action opus. A monolithic slum building run by deadly criminals becomes a gauntlet of survival for a S.W.A.T. team on a mission to apprehend its drug lord overseer. After a series of daunting setbacks, the team find themselves trapped with no option other than to fight their way out. The Raid raised Asian cinema's action bar with its frenetic pace, non-stop bone-crunching battles, and innovative silat-based choreography all set against the gritty backdrop of a Jakarta ghetto and its formidable and colorful underworld denizens.

Tickets are between $5 and $15. 

For more information and to register for the event, click here

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The International Conference on Protection and Accountability in Burma
Feb
8
to Feb 9

The International Conference on Protection and Accountability in Burma

Come hear renowned scholars of genocide, post-colonial studies, and law, global activists, UN officials, & political leaders, as well as Myanmar's victims of what UN calls "gravest crimes in international law" (genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes). See the full program (draft) here.

This conference is designed to call world’s attention to and educate the international public at large about the twofold need for protection and accountability which Rohingya genocide survivors and other ethnic and religious minorities such as Kachin, Shan, Karen, Myanmar Muslims, etc. demand and deserve.

Registration table opens at 8:30 am. Doors will open at 8:45 am. Those arriving late must wait to be seated and may forfeit their ticket to waitlisted individuals.

Please do not arrive with any large bags or containers. A valid ID is required for entry.

Please contact ColumbiaBurmaConference@gmail.com for questions, comments, and inquiries related to the conference.

Register for the here.

Hosted by The Institute for the Study of Human Rights (Columbia University), GlobalCultural Studies (Columbia University), Free Rohingya Coalition, South Asia Institute (Columbia University), and The Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies (Barnard College).

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Testing Legislator Responsiveness to Citizens and Firms in Single-Party
Jan
31
11:30 AM11:30

Testing Legislator Responsiveness to Citizens and Firms in Single-Party

  • 34 Hillhouse Avenue New Haven, CT, 06511 United States (map)
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Edmund Malesky is a Professor of Political Science at Duke University. Malesky is a specialist on Southeast Asia, particularly Vietnam. Currently, Malesky's research agenda is very much at the intersection of Comparative and International Political Economy, falling into three major categories: 1) Authoritarian political institutions and their consequences; 2) The political influence of foreign direct investment and multinational corporations; and 3) Political institutions, private business development, and formalization.

Hosted by the Leitner Program.

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Last Days of the Mighty Mekong: Navigating an Unsustainable Development Pathway
Jan
23
12:00 PM12:00

Last Days of the Mighty Mekong: Navigating an Unsustainable Development Pathway

  • 34 Hillhouse Avenue New Haven, CT, 06511 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Mekong River flows through China, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam. Its basin is one of the world's most biodiverse and home to more than two hundred ethnic groups, many of which live in upland, mountainous areas which Yale professor James C. Scott and others have labeled Zomia. The river naturally provides an abundance of resources, and this, coupled with its remoteness are the key to the region's diversity. But plans for more than two hundred dams in the Mekong Basin will cut off critical ecological flows that allow local communities to thrive. Further, an economic development model imported from the West and China will transform this part of the world from a unique patchwork of humanity to a widely connected, globalized space. Brian Eyler, Director of the Stimson Center's Southeast Asia program, will discuss the mightiness of the Mekong, examine cultural and ecological threats posed by unsustainable economic development practices and climate change, and discuss how communities and downstream government are building resilience to cope with future crises. He will also discuss his own policy work which promotes alternative and more sustainable development pathways to the business as usual development model in the Mekong. 

Brian Eyler is an expert on transboundary issues in the Mekong region and specializes in China's economic cooperation with Southeast Asia. He has spent more than 15 years living and working in China and over the last decade has conducted extensive research and engagement with stakeholders and policy makers in the Mekong region. Before coming to the Stimson Center, he served as the Director of the IES Kunming Center at Yunnan University and as a consultant to the UNDP Lancang-Mekong Economic Cooperation program in Kunming, Yunnan province. He holds a MA from the University of California, San Diego and a BA from Bucknell University. Brian is the co-founder of the influential website EastBySoutheast.com. His first book, The Last Days of the Mighty Mekong will be published by Zed Books in February 2019.

Find more information here.

Hosted by Council on Southeast Asia Studies at Yale University.

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Reflections on Brokering Authority: 12 Years In and Still Muddling Through in Indonesia
Dec
4
12:00 PM12:00

Reflections on Brokering Authority: 12 Years In and Still Muddling Through in Indonesia

  • 34 Hillhouse Avenue New Haven, CT, 06511 United States (map)
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Steve Rhee works on securing access for rural communities to land and forest resources from the foundation's Jakarta office. His grant making supports efforts to increase the well-being of poor Indonesians in fragile rural areas. His work promotes policies that give poor and marginalized groups more control over natural resources. 

Before joining the Ford Foundation in 2009, Steve's development work focused on international natural resource management. He has held research and policy posts at several institutions, including the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and the U.S. Department of State. In these roles, he collaborated with a range of stakeholders from villagers in Indonesian Borneo to senior government officials in Washington, DC. He has lived in Indonesia since 1996, working on community-based natural resource management issues. He has also worked in mainland Southeast Asia, Timor-Leste and Nepal.

Steve has had several transformational learning opportunities, including serving in the Peace Corps, the Fulbright-Hays Research Abroad Program, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science's (AAAS) Science & Technology Policy Fellowship. He received his PhD and Masters’ degrees from Yale University, where his training focused on governance, institutions and trade related to sustainable development.

Recognizing his commitment to evidence-based policy, AAAS selected Steve as one of 40 Science & Technology Policy Fellow alumni demonstrating “exemplary dedication to applying science to serve society.”

Hosted by Southeast Asia Studies at Yale.

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Putting Rohingya Voices Back into the Rohingya Crisis
Nov
13
to Nov 14

Putting Rohingya Voices Back into the Rohingya Crisis

  • 295 Lafayette Street New York, NY 10012 (map)
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Join NYSEAN as Elliott Prasse-Freeman discusses the humanitarian crisis in Myanmar. In the wake of the ethnic cleansing of more than 700,000 Rohingya from Myanmar, various debates have erupted: What do the Rohingya want (their own state, a safe return to Burma, relocation)?  And who are they (an indigenous ethnic group, “Bengali" interlopers masquerading as Burmese autochthons, a religious minority)? This talk, based on on-going research in refugee camps in Cox Bazaar and with members of the Rohingya diaspora, considers Rohingya social and political identity from a number of sociopolitical contexts, presenting historical, linguistic, and political data to complicate narratives advanced by disparate sides of the debate. The talk reintroduces voices of non-elites - Rohingya widows forced to flee Burma; Rohingya youth attempting to 'pass' in Bangladeshi society - that have been excluded from many of these discussions.

Elliott Prasse-Freeman is an Assistant Professor at National University of Singapore in Anthropology/Sociology. His research focuses on social movements, daily politics, and ethnicity in Burma and Southeast Asia more broadly.

Hosted by NYSEAN.

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DOC NYC: Ghost Fleet
Nov
9
9:30 PM21:30

DOC NYC: Ghost Fleet

  • 323 6th Avenue New York, NY, 10014 United States (map)
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NYC PREMIERE Acclaimed at Telluride and the Toronto International Film Festival, this suspenseful high-seas adventure follows a team of activists who rescue modern-day slaves in Thailand’s illegal fishing industry. Thai activist Patima Tungpuchayakul was nominated for the Nobel Prize for her work rescuing thousands of victims. We follow her as she tracks down escaped slaves who live like Robinson Crusoe on remote islands, helping to bring these long-vanished ghosts back to life and to their families.

Find more information here.

Hosted by DOC NYC.

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