Filtering by: Myanmar

The Rohingya Genocide: A Panel Discussion
May
21
6:30 PM18:30

The Rohingya Genocide: A Panel Discussion

  • Union Theological Seminary, James Chapel, 3041 Broadway New York, NY, 10027 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join us for an evening of presentation and discussion concerning the history and development of the Rohingya humanitarian tragedy in Myanmar and the resulting refugee crisis. The evening’s conversation will focus on the causes and conditions of the crisis along with the role that Buddhist laity and monastic communities have played in the rhetoric and violence. Led by an esteemed guest panel, this open discussion will hopefully bring a better understanding to the situation and identify compassionate ways of seeking justice and delivering relief to those who are suffering.

The panelists for the event are:

  • Khin Mai Aung, US Coordinator of the Free Rohingya Coalition

  • Dr. Azeem Ibrahim, Author of “The Rohingyas: Inside Myanmar's Hidden Genocide”

  • Adem Carroll, New York and UN Program Director of the Burma Task Force

  • Ashley Aye Aye Dun, Writer and Founder of Saddha: Buddhists For Peace

To register for the event, click here.

HOSTED BY:

  • The Buddhist Action Coalition

  • Buddhist Council of New York

  • The Union Thích Nhất Hạnh Program for Engaged Buddhism

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Time and Kinship: Rebirth and Being in Burmese Buddhist Cosmology
Apr
18
12:00 PM12:00

Time and Kinship: Rebirth and Being in Burmese Buddhist Cosmology

  • 420 West 118th Street New York, NY, 10027 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Burmese Buddhists tell rebirth stories to explain where they came from and will go, from previous life to the next in the cycle of rebirth. The ultimate goal of their existence is not for the cycle to continue but to end, so as to attain nirvana. The Western modernist assumption of linear endlessly progressing time embedded in standard models of kinship in anthropology needs to be withdrawn to take into account the Burmese Buddhist experience and practice of kinship, with its multiple concepts of time and multiple paths through which relatedness by blood and water unfold along cycles of rebirth. The Burmese case invites an anthropological inquiry into the concept of time, and offers a critique of, and alternative to, the Western idea of teleological progress.

Please join us for a seminar featuring Naoko Kumada, a research fellow at the School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, and moderated by Zhaohua Yang, the Sheng Yen Assistant Professor of Chinese Buddhism at the Columbia Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. No registration is required for the event. 

For more information, click here

Hosted by: 

  • Columbia Weatherhead East Asian Institute

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The Rohingya: Statelessness, Refugeehood and a ‘Subhuman’ Life, by Nasir Uddin
Feb
11
12:15 PM12:15

The Rohingya: Statelessness, Refugeehood and a ‘Subhuman’ Life, by Nasir Uddin

The Rohingyas, an ethno-linguistic and religious minority of Myanmar known as the most persecuted people in the world, experienced a brutal atrocity in 2017 perpetrated by Myanmar security forces and vigilantes what the United Nations Human Rights Council explained as “a textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” Following an attack made by the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) on August 25, 2017, Myanmar security forces launched a clearance operation, which, a report of a three-member-panel appointed by the United Nations confirms, forced 725,000 Rohingyas to flee to Bangladesh, about 10,000 Rohingyas were killed in the first two months, hundreds of women and girls were (gang) raped, and 392 villages were partially or totally destroyed. Along with the previous ones, Bangladesh now hosts 1.3 million Rohingya in its Southeastern part, Ukhia and Teknaf. The locals are becoming ‘unwelcoming’ since 1.3 million additional people have begun to share local resources, livelihood sources, and social utilities. In Myanmar, if we considering the intensity of atrocity committed by the state forces, the ways the Rohingyas have been dealt with as if they are not human beings. Now, the Rohingyas are ‘struggling for existence’ in Bangladesh having an obscured past, critical present and an uncertain future. The Rohingyas belong to no state as Myanmar stripped of their citizenship four decades ago and Bangladesh does not recognize them even as refugees. Given the context, the talk with empirically grounded evidences presents the current states of Rohingya in the Borderland of Bangladesh and Myanmar within the broader spectrum of statelessness, refugeehood and “subhuman life”.  

Nasir Uddin is a cultural anthropologist based in Bangladesh, and Professor of Anthropology at Chittagong University. Currently, he is working as a Research Consultant with the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at SOAS, University of London. 

Find more information here.

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The International Conference on Protection and Accountability in Burma
Feb
8
to Feb 9

The International Conference on Protection and Accountability in Burma

Come hear renowned scholars of genocide, post-colonial studies, and law, global activists, UN officials, & political leaders, as well as Myanmar's victims of what UN calls "gravest crimes in international law" (genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes). See the full program (draft) here.

This conference is designed to call world’s attention to and educate the international public at large about the twofold need for protection and accountability which Rohingya genocide survivors and other ethnic and religious minorities such as Kachin, Shan, Karen, Myanmar Muslims, etc. demand and deserve.

Registration table opens at 8:30 am. Doors will open at 8:45 am. Those arriving late must wait to be seated and may forfeit their ticket to waitlisted individuals.

Please do not arrive with any large bags or containers. A valid ID is required for entry.

Please contact ColumbiaBurmaConference@gmail.com for questions, comments, and inquiries related to the conference.

Register for the here.

Hosted by The Institute for the Study of Human Rights (Columbia University), GlobalCultural Studies (Columbia University), Free Rohingya Coalition, South Asia Institute (Columbia University), and The Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies (Barnard College).

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Putting Rohingya Voices Back into the Rohingya Crisis
Nov
13
to Nov 14

Putting Rohingya Voices Back into the Rohingya Crisis

  • 295 Lafayette Street New York, NY 10012 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join NYSEAN as Elliott Prasse-Freeman discusses the humanitarian crisis in Myanmar. In the wake of the ethnic cleansing of more than 700,000 Rohingya from Myanmar, various debates have erupted: What do the Rohingya want (their own state, a safe return to Burma, relocation)?  And who are they (an indigenous ethnic group, “Bengali" interlopers masquerading as Burmese autochthons, a religious minority)? This talk, based on on-going research in refugee camps in Cox Bazaar and with members of the Rohingya diaspora, considers Rohingya social and political identity from a number of sociopolitical contexts, presenting historical, linguistic, and political data to complicate narratives advanced by disparate sides of the debate. The talk reintroduces voices of non-elites - Rohingya widows forced to flee Burma; Rohingya youth attempting to 'pass' in Bangladeshi society - that have been excluded from many of these discussions.

Elliott Prasse-Freeman is an Assistant Professor at National University of Singapore in Anthropology/Sociology. His research focuses on social movements, daily politics, and ethnicity in Burma and Southeast Asia more broadly.

Hosted by NYSEAN.

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Myanmar Up Close
Jun
12
8:30 AM08:30

Myanmar Up Close

Myanmar's top-down transition from over 50 years of harsh military rule to an elected government led by long-celebrated democracy and human rights icon Aung San Suu Kyi brought hope that the country's moment for political and economic transition had truly come. While Myanmar has certainly made strides, in the past few years these have largely slowed, and political and economic power has remained rooted in the hands of the military. Tragedies and challenges have abounded, from the horrific treatment and plight of the Rohingya, to increased violent conflict between the military and various other ethnic groups, to hampered economic reform, strained bilateral relationships, governance challenges, and more.

Given these and other challenges, where are the opportunities for a positive way forward? What's next for Myanmar’s transition?

Join the Asia Society Policy Institute (ASPI) for a discussion with Ambassador Derek Mitchell, who served as U.S. Ambassador to Myanmar from 2012 to 2016. He will be joined in conversation by ASPI's Debra Eisenman, who recently returned from Myanmar, and is the author of an ASPI report on the state of Myanmar's transition and recommendations for ways forward.

Register here.

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Myanmar in Transition: Historic Change at the Crossroads of Asia
May
2
12:00 PM12:00

Myanmar in Transition: Historic Change at the Crossroads of Asia

  • Columbia University International Affairs Rm. 1512 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Derek Mitchell, Senior Adviser to Albright Stonebridge Group and the United States Institute of Peace. Previously, Mitchell was U.S. Ambassador to Myanmar from 2012 to 2016, the first in 22 years. He has also served as U.S. Department of State's first Special Representative and Policy Coordinator for Burma and principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Asian and Pacific Security Affairs.  Moderator: Ann Marie Murphy, Associate Professor Seton Hall University, and Senior Research Scholar, Weatherhead East Asian Institute

Hosted by NYSEAN, Southeast Asia Seminar, Columbia Weatherhead East Asian Institute.

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The Rohingya Crisis: Human Rights and the International Community
Mar
28
5:00 PM17:00

The Rohingya Crisis: Human Rights and the International Community

Panel Discussion By:

Nadira Khudayberdieva, Myanmar Expert, Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect

Fung Li, Human Rights officer, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

His Excellency Masud Bin Momen, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Bangladesh to the United Nations

Francis Wade, An independent journalist and analyst, covering Burma and Southeast Asia

Alex Whiting, Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School

Register here.

Hosted by CUNY International Law Society, NYSEAN, American Brunch of the International Law Association, APALSA, CSA, FIRE, IRAP, MLSA, South Asian Bar Association of NY and UNICEF Campus Initiative.

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