Filtering by: Religion

The Voices of the Victims: The Rohingyas and their “Subhuman” Life
Sep
10
6:15 PM18:15

The Voices of the Victims: The Rohingyas and their “Subhuman” Life

  • International Affairs Building, Columbia University, Room 802 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Accounts gathered by Nasir Uddin from the Rohingyas living in Ukhia and Teknaf unfold the horrible ways they were dealt with as if they were lesser than human beings what Uddin terms “subhuman” life. This talk presents the first-hand narratives of the Rohingya refugees, the voices of the victims, in the broader spectrum of statelessness, refugeehood and human rights in the world.

View Event →
Indonesia’s Religions and Their Contested Narratives
Aug
14
12:00 PM12:00

Indonesia’s Religions and Their Contested Narratives

  • The Puck Building, Mulberry Conference Room (Room 3072) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This presentation examines the contested place of religion in political and local narratives in Indonesia. At times, state and regional policies appear to legalize discrimination towards some religious communities. These policies, however, are often at odds with local traditions and more modern efforts aimed maintaining religious pluralism. Based on fieldwork in Java, Sulawesi and Maluku, this presentation argues that local efforts aimed at promoting religious pluralism, both on the ground and online, function as a reservoir of inter-faith understanding that supports national government efforts to maintain peace between religious communities.

View Event →
The Rohingya Genocide: A Panel Discussion
May
21
6:30 PM18:30

The Rohingya Genocide: A Panel Discussion

  • Union Theological Seminary, James Chapel, 3041 Broadway New York, NY, 10027 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join us for an evening of presentation and discussion concerning the history and development of the Rohingya humanitarian tragedy in Myanmar and the resulting refugee crisis. The evening’s conversation will focus on the causes and conditions of the crisis along with the role that Buddhist laity and monastic communities have played in the rhetoric and violence. Led by an esteemed guest panel, this open discussion will hopefully bring a better understanding to the situation and identify compassionate ways of seeking justice and delivering relief to those who are suffering.

The panelists for the event are:

  • Khin Mai Aung, US Coordinator of the Free Rohingya Coalition

  • Dr. Azeem Ibrahim, Author of “The Rohingyas: Inside Myanmar's Hidden Genocide”

  • Adem Carroll, New York and UN Program Director of the Burma Task Force

  • Ashley Aye Aye Dun, Writer and Founder of Saddha: Buddhists For Peace

To register for the event, click here.

HOSTED BY:

  • The Buddhist Action Coalition

  • Buddhist Council of New York

  • The Union Thích Nhất Hạnh Program for Engaged Buddhism

View Event →
Islamist Agenda in Indonesia Beyond 2019
May
16
12:00 PM12:00

Islamist Agenda in Indonesia Beyond 2019

  • The Puck Building, 295 Lafayette Street, Mulberry Conference Room (Room 3072), 3rd Floor New York City, NY 10012 United States of America (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A fragile alliance of Islamist groups known as the "212 Movement" that first emerged in 2016 has managed to sustain its mobilizing power by using Prabowo, the rival of incumbent candidate Joko Widodo, as a rallying point during the campaign leading up to the April 17 election. Now that Prabowo is the presumed loser, what will happen to the Islamists? Is a Jokowi win really a victory for pluralist democracy?

Nava Nuraniyah has been an analyst at the Jakarta-based Institute for Policy Analysis of Conflict (IPAC) since 2015, and her research interests include the role of Islam in politics as well as the evolution of extremism in South East Asia, including the role of women. Before joining IPAC, she worked as a researcher on terrorism and radicalization in Indonesia at the Centre of Excellence for National Security, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Singapore.

For more information, click here.

HOSTED BY:

  • NYSEAN

  • Race to Istana

  • Wagner's Office of International Programs

View Event →
“Beyond Debt: Islamic Experiments in Global Finance”
Apr
25
4:30 PM16:30

“Beyond Debt: Islamic Experiments in Global Finance”

Recent economic crises have made the centrality of debt, and the instability it creates, increasingly apparent. This realization has led to cries for change—yet there is little popular awareness of possible alternatives. This talk, based on a book of the same title, describes efforts to create a transnational economy free of debt. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Malaysia, the talk illustrates how the state, led by the central bank, seeks to make the country’s capital Kuala Lumpur “the New York of the Muslim world”—the central node of global financial activity conducted in accordance with Islam. The talk will illustrate how Islamic financial experts have undertaken ambitious experiments to create more stable economies and stronger social solidarities by facilitating risk- and profit-sharing, enhanced entrepreneurial skills, and more collaborative economic action. Building on scholarship that reveals the impact of financial devices on human activity, the talk describes how Islamic finance is deployed to fashion subjects who are at once more pious Muslims and more ambitious entrepreneurs. In so doing, the talk shows how experts seek to create a new “geo-economics” centered in Southeast Asia—a global Islamic alternative to the conventional financial network centered on New York, London, and Tokyo. A groundbreaking analysis of a timely subject, Beyond Debt tells the captivating story of efforts to re-center international finance in an emergent Islamic global city and, ultimately, to challenge the very foundations of conventional finance. The speaker, Daromir Rudnyckyj, is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Victoria. 

For more information, click here

Hosted by: 

  • Cornell Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies

  • Cornell Department of Anthropology

  • Cornell SC Johnson College of Business

  • Cornell Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management

  • Cornell Department of Economics

  • Cornell Comparative Muslim Societies Program

  • Cornell Southeast Asia Program

  • Cornell Global Learning

  • Global Cornell

View Event →
Time and Kinship: Rebirth and Being in Burmese Buddhist Cosmology
Apr
18
12:00 PM12:00

Time and Kinship: Rebirth and Being in Burmese Buddhist Cosmology

  • 420 West 118th Street New York, NY, 10027 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Burmese Buddhists tell rebirth stories to explain where they came from and will go, from previous life to the next in the cycle of rebirth. The ultimate goal of their existence is not for the cycle to continue but to end, so as to attain nirvana. The Western modernist assumption of linear endlessly progressing time embedded in standard models of kinship in anthropology needs to be withdrawn to take into account the Burmese Buddhist experience and practice of kinship, with its multiple concepts of time and multiple paths through which relatedness by blood and water unfold along cycles of rebirth. The Burmese case invites an anthropological inquiry into the concept of time, and offers a critique of, and alternative to, the Western idea of teleological progress.

Please join us for a seminar featuring Naoko Kumada, a research fellow at the School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, and moderated by Zhaohua Yang, the Sheng Yen Assistant Professor of Chinese Buddhism at the Columbia Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. No registration is required for the event. 

For more information, click here

Hosted by: 

  • Columbia Weatherhead East Asian Institute

View Event →
Religious Pluralism in Indonesia
Apr
12
to Apr 13

Religious Pluralism in Indonesia

The last twenty years have seen Indonesia navigate the rocky waters of post-authoritarian democratic rule, a.k.a. reformasi. This conference seeks to address the state of religious pluralism in the post-Suharto era (1965-1998) with case-studies from across the religious spectrum. Is the Pancasila framework working? Who’s driving the movement for inclusivist practices? And conversely, who is leading exclusivism? What is the relationship between “civil society groups” and the state? How have minorities fared so far? What challenges are they facing? These are some of the questions panelists will be attempting to answer, so to offer a multi-disciplinary perspective on the issue of religious pluralism in Indonesia. Although focused on Indonesia’s own particular realities, this workshop will be of interest to the wider scholarly community at Cornell, as we’ll touch upon issues at the core of the question of how state, citizens and organized civil society interact on the field of religious in/tolerance.

For more information, click here

Hosted by: 

  • Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies's Southeast Asia Program

View Event →
The International Conference on Protection and Accountability in Burma
Feb
8
to Feb 9

The International Conference on Protection and Accountability in Burma

Come hear renowned scholars of genocide, post-colonial studies, and law, global activists, UN officials, & political leaders, as well as Myanmar's victims of what UN calls "gravest crimes in international law" (genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes). See the full program (draft) here.

This conference is designed to call world’s attention to and educate the international public at large about the twofold need for protection and accountability which Rohingya genocide survivors and other ethnic and religious minorities such as Kachin, Shan, Karen, Myanmar Muslims, etc. demand and deserve.

Registration table opens at 8:30 am. Doors will open at 8:45 am. Those arriving late must wait to be seated and may forfeit their ticket to waitlisted individuals.

Please do not arrive with any large bags or containers. A valid ID is required for entry.

Please contact ColumbiaBurmaConference@gmail.com for questions, comments, and inquiries related to the conference.

Register for the here.

Hosted by The Institute for the Study of Human Rights (Columbia University), GlobalCultural Studies (Columbia University), Free Rohingya Coalition, South Asia Institute (Columbia University), and The Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies (Barnard College).

View Event →
“Alive in the Archive: Ambivalence, Assemblage, Animation" Lecture by Patricia Spyer
Oct
11
5:00 PM17:00

“Alive in the Archive: Ambivalence, Assemblage, Animation" Lecture by Patricia Spyer

  • Silver Center for Arts & Science Rm. 301 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In the uncertain early 2000s when violence between Muslims and Christians racked Maluku on Indonesia’s eastern outskirts, Pentecostal ministers launched an iconoclastic attack on the headhunter portraits and warlord statues of Seram Island’s culture museum. The presentation explores the clash between distinct regimes of revelation intrinsic to museum and pentecostalism alike as the juncture at which a contested past became animated, gaining purchase on the present. This caused a ‘crisis of faith’ for the museum director, and left broken statues in its wake. Specifically, The Graduate Institute Geneva's Dr. Patricia Spyer consider the constellation of desires, forces, materialities, and ontological instabilities.

Find more information here.

Hosted by NYU Center for Religion and Media.

View Event →
Gamelan Dharma Swara Blessing Ceremony & Season Launch Reception
Sep
23
4:00 PM16:00

Gamelan Dharma Swara Blessing Ceremony & Season Launch Reception

Join Gamelan Dharma Swara on Sunday, September 23 for two very special events to launch their 2018-2019 season.

INSTRUMENT BLESSING CEREMONY: 4PM -5:30PM

We're conducting a traditional Balinese Hindu blessing ceremony for our very own gamelan!This is a milestone moment for Gamelan Dharma Swara, who for the last 20 years performed and practiced on borrowed instruments from generous host institutions. It will be the first one conducted since the new gamelan made its journey from Bali to New York in 2017--a spiritual awakening of the instruments in their new home. Our ceremony will be officiated by Dharma Swara Artist in Residence I Gusti Nyoman Darta and invites audience participation.The ceremony will be followed by a music and dance performance by Gamelan Dharma Swara.

SEASON LAUNCH RECEPTION: 6PM-9PM

In the mood for a party?  We'll continue the festivities with a ticketed reception that will mark the official launch of our 2018-19 season.  Under the full moon and against the inspiring Manhattan Skyline, join us for an evening of food, drinks, music and mingling.

Purchase tickets here.

Hosted by Gamelan Dharma Swara.

View Event →
Why Terrorists Quit
May
4
5:00 PM17:00

Why Terrorists Quit

Julie Chernov Hwang will talk about her new book, Why Terrorists Quit: the Disengagement of Indonesian Jihadists, which explores how some Indonesian Islamist extremists are disengaging from violence and reintegrating back into society. She will describe the psychological, relational, rational and emotional processes underpinning disengagement in Indonesia and their implications for effective counter-terrorism policy. 

Julie Chernov Hwang is an associate professor of political science and international relations in the Center for People, Politics and Markets at Goucher College. Her new research project examines pathways to entry into Southeast Asian Islamist extremist groups. 

For more information, click here

Hosted by NYSEAN.

View Event →
Mediating Islam: Journalism in Southeast Asia
Mar
30
12:00 PM12:00

Mediating Islam: Journalism in Southeast Asia

Janet Steele (George Washington University) will speak on her newest book, Mediating Islam. In Mediating Islam, "Janet Steele examines day-to-day reporting practices of Muslim professionals, from conservative scripturalists to pluralist cosmopolitans, at five exemplary news organizations in Malaysia and Indonesia."

More information on her book here.

Register here.

Hosted by NYSEAN.


View Event →
Extrajudicial Killings in the Philippines and the Church's Response
Feb
6
4:00 PM16:00

Extrajudicial Killings in the Philippines and the Church's Response

  • Columbia International Affairs Building Rm. 918 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Assigned to Davao city during Rodrigo Duterte's mayoralty, Fr. Picardal helped document nearly 1,500 killings linked to the Davao Death Squad. Imprisoned and tortured during the Marcos era, he has spent many years on Mindanao as an educator and human rights advocate. Until recently, Fr. Picardal was in charge of the Catholic Bishops Conference Committee on Basic Ecclesial Communities. He is a prolific writer and has preached against the "blood lust" in the latest round of killings linked to Duterte's war on drugs.

The talk will be moderated by Professor Sheila Coronel of the Columbia Journalism School.

Hosted by NYSEAN

View Event →
Extrajudicial Killings in the Philippines and the Church's Response
Feb
5
12:00 PM12:00

Extrajudicial Killings in the Philippines and the Church's Response

  • Chancellor's Suite, Seton Hall University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Assigned to Davao city during Rodrigo Duterte's mayoralty, Fr. Picardal helped document nearly 1,500 killings linked to the Davao Death Squad. Imprisoned and tortured during the Marcos era, he has spent many years on Mindanao as an educator and human rights advocate. Until recently, Fr. Picardal was in charge of the Catholic Bishops Conference Committee on Basic Ecclesial Communities. He is a prolific writer and has preached against the "blood lust" in the latest round of killings linked to Duterte's war on drugs.


Hosted by NYSEAN and the Center for Emerging Powers and Transnational Trends

View Event →
Understanding the Rohingya Crisis: Racial and Religious Histories in Burma and the Responsibilities of Regional Neighbors in the Humanitarian Response
Nov
14
3:00 PM15:00

Understanding the Rohingya Crisis: Racial and Religious Histories in Burma and the Responsibilities of Regional Neighbors in the Humanitarian Response

  • International Affairs Building (IAB) 918, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

While the crisis in Myanmar has been growing in the international community's consciousness, there is a lack of understanding of the roots of the conflict.

In the first part of our discussion, we will explore the systematic othering of Rohingya and the growing fear of Islam in the country. In the second half, we will discuss the potential role that regional neighbors should play.

View Event →
Understanding the Rohingya Crisis: Race, Religion, and Violence in Burma
Nov
10
4:00 PM16:00

Understanding the Rohingya Crisis: Race, Religion, and Violence in Burma

  • Luce Hall Auditorium, Yale University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Francis Wade joins a panel with James C Scott, Sterling Professor Political Science at Yale and Kyaw Hsan Hlaing, a Burmese peace activist working on Rohingya issues.

The Rohingya, a Muslim minority of Burma of approximately one million people, are enduring a protracted and ongoing ethnic cleansing campaign. In September alone the Myanmar military burned hundreds of villages and forced nearly half a million to flee to Bangladesh. Journalist Francis Wade, the author of Myanmar’s Enemy Within: Buddhist Violence and the Making of a Muslim ‘Other’ (2017), joins a panel of scholars and activists to explore the deep roots of these events, examining how violent prejudices were nurtured by the military and activated during the democratic transition, and what potential there is for peace and security in Burma not only for the Rohingya but for the country’s other minorities. 

View Event →
Sittwe: Film Screening and Discussion
Oct
25
1:00 PM13:00

Sittwe: Film Screening and Discussion

  • International Affairs Building Room 918, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Sittwe tells about two teenagers in Burma’s Rakhine state who were displaced by communal violence in 2012: a Muslim girl named Phyu Phyu Than and a Buddhist boy named Aung Khan Myint. Interviews recorded over two years explore their ideas about education and the possibility of reconciliation. The film, in Rakhine, Bengali and Burmese with English subtitles, aims to give voice to two sides of the conflict to enable a way forwards towards peace. 

The event will consist of a screening of a 20 minute documentary followed by Q&A with human rights advocate, Myo Win and ISHR visiting scholar Kyaw Hsan Hlaing.

View Event →
Brokering Religion and Development: Ethnographic Approaches to NGOs
May
18
12:30 PM12:30

Brokering Religion and Development: Ethnographic Approaches to NGOs

Religious NGOs have attracted considerable scholarly and professional attention over the past two decades, resulting in a flurry of surveys and mapping exercises, as well as a number of practitioner-oriented handbooks and toolkits aiming at integrating religion into development programming. Beyond these more instrumentalist approaches, however, ethnographic approaches are beginning to provide new insight into the ways in which emergent institutional forms advocating diverse social interventions arise out of or in conversation with religious communities and discourses on transcendent values. Our project seeks to explore how religious actors, discourses, and practices intersect with development efforts, and how these engagements result in changes to our understandings and experiences of both ‘religion' and ‘development'.

View Event →
From Rite of Passage to Intangible Cultural Heritage: Incorporation of the Salak Yom Buddhist Ritual into Global Discourses of Heritage and Development
Apr
13
12:00 PM12:00

From Rite of Passage to Intangible Cultural Heritage: Incorporation of the Salak Yom Buddhist Ritual into Global Discourses of Heritage and Development

  • Cornell University - Kahin Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Drawing on my research on the Buddhist Salak Yom festival in Lamphun Province between 2009 and 2016, I will show how the official designation of this merit-making ritual as first provincial, then national, and now international heritage has led to starkly divergent opinions among community and state actors about how the Salak Yom should be safeguarded. While some local actors and communities have benefitted from the commercialization and promotion led by state heritage and tourism authorities, many more senior local community members favor instead a return to a simpler, more authentic expression of the festival centered on merit-making rather than visual spectacle. This paper presents these manifold perspectives and considers how these different actors might have a voice in shaping the evolving meaning and practice of this ritual.  

View Event →
Dharma in Motion: Buddhism and Mobility Across the South China Sea
Mar
19
12:00 PM12:00

Dharma in Motion: Buddhism and Mobility Across the South China Sea

Chia’s talk will reconsider Kuah-Pearce’s concept of  “reformist Buddhism” through the case of Yen Pei. He argues for the need to historicize “reformist Buddhism” in the Singapore context and to consider the Buddhist networks linking multiple nodes that circulated people, ideas, practices, and money between China, Taiwan, Southeast Asia, and beyond. In addition, he will demonstrate that a study of the transnational biography of Yen Pei is a fine example of how an individual life, examined in grainy detail, can offer insights into Buddhism and modernity in Asia. At a broader level, the case of Yen Pei reveals how Singapore’s Buddhist history was intertwined with the larger history of the modernization and globalization of Chinese-language Buddhism in the twentieth century.

View Event →
Interpreting Communal Violence in Myanmar
Mar
2
12:00 PM12:00

Interpreting Communal Violence in Myanmar

  • Puck Building, Mulberry Conference Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

From 2012 to 2014, Myanmar experienced recurrent, sporadic, collective acts of lethal violence, realized through repeated public expressions that Muslims constitute an existential threat to Buddhists. In this talk, I draw on scholarship from Indonesia and India to make a case for classing and analyzing the violence as “communal.” I conclude with some tentative remarks on the relationship between communal violence, anti-Muslim sentiment, and the most recent military operations in Myanmar’s west. 

View Event →