Filtering by: International Relations
Beyond the Grass and the Elephants: Strategic Thinking in Southeast Asia
Sep
19
4:00 PM16:00

Beyond the Grass and the Elephants: Strategic Thinking in Southeast Asia

What is strategic thinking? Are the foreign policies of some Southeast Asian states more strategic than those of others? If so, in what way, and with what implications for US policy?

Donald K. Emmerson heads the Southeast Asia Program in the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford University, where he is also a faculty affiliate of the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies and the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law.

View Event →
Arc of Containment: Britain, the United States, and Anticommunism in Southeast Asia
Oct
23
12:00 PM12:00

Arc of Containment: Britain, the United States, and Anticommunism in Southeast Asia

  • Roon 203, Luce Hall, Yale University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Council on Southeast Asia Studies at Yale University’s Brown Bag Seminar Series presents “Arc of Containment: Britain, the United States, and Anticommunism in Southeast Asia.”

Major studies of American foreign relations treat U.S. failures in Vietnam as the end of both a short-lived American empire and western imperialism in Southeast Asia. Wen-Qing Ngoei, assistant professor of History at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, argues that Vietnam was an exception to the region’s overall pro-U.S. trajectory after 1945, that British neocolonialism and Southeast Asian anticommunism melded with preexisting local antipathy toward China and the Chinese diaspora to usher the region from formal colonialism to U.S. hegemony.

View Event →
ISG 2019 Lemkin Award and Lecture
Oct
24
5:30 PM17:30

ISG 2019 Lemkin Award and Lecture

  • Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Room 1008 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The biennial Lemkin Award honors Raphael Lemkin, the originator of the term "genocide" and exponent of the UN Genocide Convention. The award recognizes the best non-fiction work focusing on genocide, crimes against humanity and other gross human rights violations, and on strategies of prevention. This year's award recipient is Professor Geoffrey Robinson, Department of History at UCLA, for "The Killing Season: A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66."

View Event →

Hmong Fugitive History and Refugee Epistemology
Sep
12
12:00 PM12:00

Hmong Fugitive History and Refugee Epistemology

  • Kahin Center, Cornell University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This talk examines the critical narratives of refugee migration and community formation from a Hmong epistemological perspective. By analyzing Hmong women’s narratives against U.S. redacted archival records that erase Hmong and Laos history during the U.S. “secret war,” the talk explores the politics of knowledge formation which has generated a historiography about the Hmong refugee as a masculinized refugee soldier and a distinct U.S. ally.

View Event →
Call for Proposals: NYSEAN Partners Fund
May
31
12:00 AM00:00

Call for Proposals: NYSEAN Partners Fund

The mission of the New York Southeast Asia Network (NYSEAN) is to promote research on, and awareness of, Southeast Asia. Toward that end, NYSEAN has established the Partners Fund to foster collaboration among academics, artists, policymakers and other professionals working on contemporary Southeast Asia. To promote such cooperation, the NYSEAN Partners Fund is issuing a call for proposals aimed at funding conferences, small workshops, panel discussions, exhibitions, art installations or performances that address historical or contemporary issues in Southeast Asia and/or U.S.-Southeast Asia relations.

Proposals should be submitted to coordinator@nysean.org by May 31, 2019.

View Event →
Violence and Policing in the Philippines, Latin America, and the U.S.
Apr
22
to Apr 23

Violence and Policing in the Philippines, Latin America, and the U.S.

  • World Room, Pulitzer Hall, Columbia Journalism School (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

President Rodrigo Duterte came to power by promising a bloody war on drugs. Since he assumed office in July 2016, thousands of drug users and dealers have been killed in both police operations and murders by unknown assailants. Nearly all of these victims were poor Filipinos who lived in informal settlements in the country’s largest and most populous cities. The Philippine case is not unique. Echoes of the Philippine experience can be found worldwide.

This conference aims to bring together journalists and scholars who have explored the nexus between urban poverty, policing, and violence. It will explore how violence is woven into the fabric of policing strategies that have focused on the security and safety of the rich and the middle class, and on criminalizing the poor as thieves, drug addicts, and scoundrels. Seen in this light, the war on crime is but the latest expression of a decades-long war against the urban poor.

View Event →
The Justice Facade: Genocide, International Justice, and Human Rights in Cambodia
Apr
17
12:30 PM12:30

The Justice Facade: Genocide, International Justice, and Human Rights in Cambodia

  • 726 Broadway New York, NY, 10003 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Is there a point to international justice? Many contend that tribunals deliver not only justice but truth, reconciliation, peace, democratization, and the rule of law. These are the transitional justice ideals frequently invoked in relation to the international hybrid tribunal in Cambodia that is trying senior leaders of the Khmer Rouge regime for genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the mid-to-late 1970s. In this ground-breaking book, The Justice Facade, Alexander Hinton argues these claims are a facade masking what is most critical: the ways in which transitional justice is translated, experienced, and understood in everyday life. Rather than reading the Khmer Rouge Tribunal in the language of global justice and human rights, survivors understand the proceedings in their own terms, including Buddhist beliefs and on-going relationships with the spirits of the dead.

Alexander Hinton is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Global Affairs, Director of the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights, and UNESCO Chair on Genocide Prevention at Rutgers University, Newark. He is a past President of the International Association of Genocide Scholars and served as an expert witness at the Khmer Rouge Tribunal.

To RSVP, click here

Hosted by: 

  • NYSEAN

  • NYU Wagner's Office of International Programs

  • NYU's Liberal Studies Program

View Event →
Vietnam’s Relations with China: Domestic impact and international implications
Apr
3
12:00 PM12:00

Vietnam’s Relations with China: Domestic impact and international implications

The speaker for this Brown Bag Seminar is Ngo Vinh Long, who is a professor of Asian Studies in the History Department at the University of Maine. He has been teaching courses on China, Japan, South Asia, Southeast Asia and Vietnam at this university since 1985. His areas of interest include social and economic development in Asia and US relations with Asian countries. He is the author four books and over three hundred articles in various languages. He was a co-founder of the Committee of Asian Concerned Asian Scholars and its Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars in 1968, renamed Critical Asian Studies in 2000. He has travelled to Vietnam almost every year since 1986 to do research and to work with various academic institutions and non-governmental organizations there.

Hosted by: 

  • Yale Council On Southeast Asia Studies

View Event →
The South China Sea: US Foreign Policy Challenges and Geo-Political Impacts
Mar
29
6:00 PM18:00

The South China Sea: US Foreign Policy Challenges and Geo-Political Impacts

Conflict in the The South China Sea has become one of the most significant geopolitical concerns of the 21 century. It is estimated that that $5.3 trillion worth of goods moves through the South China Sea annually, 1.2 trillion of which is with the US. Around forty percent of global liquefied natural gas trade moves through the South China Sea. Any military conflict there would cripple critical global supply chains. In recent years, China has undertaken efforts to reclaim thousands of square feet in the South China Sea. Its construction of artificial islands and infrastructure such as  runways, support buildings, loading piers, and possible satellite communication antennas has prompted its neighbors and the US to question China’s motives. The US Navy sends ships into the South China Sea to counter what Washington sees as Beijing’s efforts to limit freedom of navigation in the strategic waters, where Chinese, Japanese, and some Southeast Asian navies operate. The slightest miscalculation could have dire consequences not just for Sino-US relations but also have implications for the region.

Can there be a “win win” situation in the South China Sea? What are China’s ultimate objectives? What should the US’s strategic goals be? How should the US and other countries within the region avoid conflict and instead foster a greater sense of trust and enhance cooperation in the South China Sea?

Moderator: Earl Carr, Adjunct Instructor, NYUSPS Center for Global Affairs; Managing Director, Momentum Advisors

Panelists:

Kimball Chen, Chairman, The Global LPG Partnership; Chairman, Energy Transportation Group, Inc.

Rorry Daniels, Deputy Project Director, Forum on Asia-Pacific Security, National Committee on American Foreign Policy

Brigadier General S. Clinton Hinote, Deputy Director, Air Force Warfighting Integration Capability; Deputy Chief of Staff for Strategic Plans and Requirements, Headquarters U.S. Air Force

Li Qingsi, Professor for International Relations, School of International Studies, Renmin University

To register, click here

Hosted by: 

  • NYUSPS Center for Global Affairs

View Event →
The Rohingya: Statelessness, Refugeehood and a ‘Subhuman’ Life, by Nasir Uddin
Feb
11
12:15 PM12:15

The Rohingya: Statelessness, Refugeehood and a ‘Subhuman’ Life, by Nasir Uddin

The Rohingyas, an ethno-linguistic and religious minority of Myanmar known as the most persecuted people in the world, experienced a brutal atrocity in 2017 perpetrated by Myanmar security forces and vigilantes what the United Nations Human Rights Council explained as “a textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” Following an attack made by the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) on August 25, 2017, Myanmar security forces launched a clearance operation, which, a report of a three-member-panel appointed by the United Nations confirms, forced 725,000 Rohingyas to flee to Bangladesh, about 10,000 Rohingyas were killed in the first two months, hundreds of women and girls were (gang) raped, and 392 villages were partially or totally destroyed. Along with the previous ones, Bangladesh now hosts 1.3 million Rohingya in its Southeastern part, Ukhia and Teknaf. The locals are becoming ‘unwelcoming’ since 1.3 million additional people have begun to share local resources, livelihood sources, and social utilities. In Myanmar, if we considering the intensity of atrocity committed by the state forces, the ways the Rohingyas have been dealt with as if they are not human beings. Now, the Rohingyas are ‘struggling for existence’ in Bangladesh having an obscured past, critical present and an uncertain future. The Rohingyas belong to no state as Myanmar stripped of their citizenship four decades ago and Bangladesh does not recognize them even as refugees. Given the context, the talk with empirically grounded evidences presents the current states of Rohingya in the Borderland of Bangladesh and Myanmar within the broader spectrum of statelessness, refugeehood and “subhuman life”.  

Nasir Uddin is a cultural anthropologist based in Bangladesh, and Professor of Anthropology at Chittagong University. Currently, he is working as a Research Consultant with the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at SOAS, University of London. 

Find more information here.

View Event →
The 3rd Yale Symposium on the Impact of Chinese Overseas Investment: Greening The Belt & Road
Jan
25
12:30 PM12:30

The 3rd Yale Symposium on the Impact of Chinese Overseas Investment: Greening The Belt & Road

  • 195 Prospect Street New Haven, CT, 06511 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This Symposium will explore the ways in which China’s impact on the world is evolving as Chinese companies and investors continue to shape global supply chains and local economies. We seek diverse perspectives from NGOs, businesses, and academia to provide nuanced analyses of various topics, including but not limited to: what the Belt and Road Initiative actually is; China’s changing environmental governance and policies; climate considerations in infrastructure development; the implications of the Belt and Road for biodiversity and ecosystems, among others.


Speakers:

Adina Matisoff, Ph.D. Candidate, University of California Los Angeles, Department of Geography 

Austin Lord, PhD Candidate, Cornell University, Department of Anthropology 

Brian Eyler, Director, Southeast Asia Program, Stimson Center

Registration is free, and food will be provided for lunch and coffee breaks.

For more information, please visit this website or email china-symposium-fes@yale.edu.

Hosted by Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.


View Event →
Lunch with Professor Mari Pangestu
Nov
13
12:00 PM12:00

Lunch with Professor Mari Pangestu

  • 1280 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY, 10027 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Professor Mari Pangestu served as Indonesia’s Minister of Trade from 2004 to 2011, and as Minister of Tourism and Creative Economy from 2011 until October 2014. As Minister of Trade she led all the international trade negotiations and cooperation for Indonesia. As Minister of Tourism and Creative Economy, apart from the tourism portfolio, she was in charge of developing a strategy for the Creative Economy in Indonesia.

Register here.

View Event →
The Asia Summits and the U.S. Midterm Elections
Nov
7
8:30 AM08:30

The Asia Summits and the U.S. Midterm Elections

Join Asia Society as Ambassador Kristie Kenney, one of America’s most highly decorated public servants, shares her insights on the state of U.S. relations with Asia ahead of a series of important annual summits taking place in November — the ASEAN and East Asia Summit in Singapore, and the APEC meeting in Papua New Guinea. She will discuss the implications of President Trump’s planned absence from the upcoming meetings for U.S. standing in the region with Asia Society Policy Institute Vice President and former Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Daniel Russel. Topics will range from the ongoing U.S.-China trade disputes to developments on the Korean peninsula, and the impact, if any, of the November midterm elections on U.S. policy towards the Indo-Pacific region.

Find more information here.

Hosted by Asia Society.

View Event →
So Far Away From Vietnam with director Laurence Gavron
Oct
25
6:15 PM18:15

So Far Away From Vietnam with director Laurence Gavron

The fall of Dien Bien Phu and the Geneva Accords in 1954 signalled the end of a century of France’s presence in Indochina. In the French army, large numbers of soldiers from the colonies, particularly North and Sub-Saharan Africa, were repatriated to their home countries. Among these were many African soldiers from the four communes of Senegal who had full French citizenship and had taken Vietnamese wives. They went home with wife, children, and sometimes mother-in-law. This film is intended as a tribute to the Vietnamese women who left everything behind to start a new life in a country they knew nothing about, very far from their homeland, their way of life and their memories. 

Hosted by Columbia’s Institute of Africana Studies.

View Event →
Indonesian Foreign Policy: From Free and Active to Leadership in the Indo-Pacific
Oct
25
2:00 PM14:00

Indonesian Foreign Policy: From Free and Active to Leadership in the Indo-Pacific

  • Columbia University International Affairs Building Rm. 918 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

For the past half-century Indonesia has pursued a foreign policy that is geared towards protecting the national interest through cooperation rather than confrontation, and through free/independent and active policy-making rather than alliances. Does such an approach to foreign policy still serve Indonesia well in dealing with the current regional and global dynamics? Joko Widodo introduced his vision to make Indonesia a Global Maritime Fulcrum soon after being sworn in as president in 2014, which three years later, in 2017, was further elaborated in the Indonesian Ocean Policy as a vision of “Indonesia as a sovereign, advanced, independent, strong maritime nation that is able to provide positive contribution for peace and security in the region as well as to the world”. Entering 2018, with Indo-Pacific being the geopolitical buzzword, Indonesia has proposed its own version of the Indo-Pacific vision. How have these latest developments shaped Indonesia’s current foreign policy?

Dr. Shafiah Muhibat is the Head of Department of International Relations, Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Indonesia. She was recently a Senior Fellow at the Maritime Security Programme, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS) Singapore from January to December 2017. She has done and taken part in extensive research projects on politics and regional security in Southeast Asia and the Asia Pacific since 2000. She has special interest in issues of regional security in East Asia, maritime security, Indonesia’s foreign policy, and regional cooperation. In addition to her interest in security issues, in the recent years she has also looked into issues related to development cooperation. She was the Chief Editor of The Indonesian Quarterly, a quarterly academic journal published by CSIS, from 2013 to 2016. She was also a lecturer at two private universities in Jakarta from 2005 to 2009. She obtained a Masters degree from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and a PhD in Political Science from the University of Hamburg.

Hosted by NYSEAN and Weatherhead East Asian Institute.

View Event →
Thailand's Post-2014 Coup Foreign Relations: Riding on the New International Trend (Lecture)
Dec
6
11:00 AM11:00

Thailand's Post-2014 Coup Foreign Relations: Riding on the New International Trend (Lecture)

  • New York University Center for Global Affairs, Woolworth Building (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Lecture by Pavin Chachavalpongpun, followed by Q&A facilitated by Christopher Ankersen.

Two events — the coup of 2014 and the royal succession unveiled the volatility of the Thai political system, and in many ways — the realm of foreign affairs. Thai foreign policy is traditionally shaped by the changing international environment. In the current political context, the coup of 2014 has exacerbated the political conflict and powerfully prescribed the way in which the country pursued its relations with the outside world. Chachavalpongpun argues that the changing international circumstances allow the military regime to entrench itself in the political realm and to exploit the latest global trend to achieve self-legitimization.

View Event →
Understanding the Rohingya Crisis: Racial and Religious Histories in Burma and the Responsibilities of Regional Neighbors in the Humanitarian Response
Nov
14
3:00 PM15:00

Understanding the Rohingya Crisis: Racial and Religious Histories in Burma and the Responsibilities of Regional Neighbors in the Humanitarian Response

  • International Affairs Building (IAB) 918, Columbia University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

While the crisis in Myanmar has been growing in the international community's consciousness, there is a lack of understanding of the roots of the conflict.

In the first part of our discussion, we will explore the systematic othering of Rohingya and the growing fear of Islam in the country. In the second half, we will discuss the potential role that regional neighbors should play.

View Event →
Middle Powers and the United Nations: Niche Agency or No Agency?
Nov
9
12:00 PM12:00

Middle Powers and the United Nations: Niche Agency or No Agency?

  • The Diplomacy Room, McQuaid Hall, Seton Hall University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In debates on the UN, attention is typically focused on instances where the organization has failed, either because of tensions between the permanent members in the Security Council, or because it has failed to adequately respond to prevent famine, genocide, or other humanitarian disasters. However, the UN is more than its failures and its most prominent body. It is a bureaucracy in which states seek to have agency: where they seek to guide and take ownership of a particular international agenda. Yet, within the academic debates on this aspect of the UN, the issue of agency of middle powers is underdeveloped. 

This presentation seeks to fill that that gap by assessing why states contribute to the effective running of the UN, and why they send peacekeepers or other personnel to make the organization tick.  In contrast to many studies of middle power that focus on Western countries like Australia and Canada, this study analyses the role of Asian middle powers, particularly Indonesia and Malaysia.

View Event →
Tipping the Balance in Southeast Asia? Thailand, the United States and China
Nov
3
11:00 AM11:00

Tipping the Balance in Southeast Asia? Thailand, the United States and China

When it comes to great power relationships, Thailand prides itself on two things. The first is its nearly 200 year diplomatic connection with the US. The second is its flexibility, captured by its ‘bending with the wind’ approach to foreign policy. John Blaxland claims that Thailand is like a bellwether for Southeast Asia. Based on surveys with over 1800 Thai officials, Blaxland claims that China’s influence has caught up and eclipsed that of the United States, with this tendency amplified by the Trump presidency and the perception of US political interference. At the same time though, strong affinities exist within the military for a continuing relationship with the US, especially in terms of security guarantees, training, and doctrine.

View Event →
The Rohingya Issue In A Global Context
Oct
30
4:30 PM16:30

The Rohingya Issue In A Global Context

  • Goldwin Smith Hall, Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium, Cornell University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Spivak will shed light on the current issues in Myanmar (Burma) related to the Rohingya and situate those issues at the global level.

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, University Professor in the Humanities, Columbia University, holds honorary degrees from the Universities of Toronto and London, and Oberlin College.  Her books are In Other Worlds (1987), Thinking Academic Freedom in Gendered Post-Coloniality (1993), Outside in the Teaching Machine (1993); Imperatives to Reimagine the Planet (1997), A Critique of Postcolonial Reason(1999), Death of a Discipline (2003), Other Asias (2007),  An Aesthetic Education in the Age of Globalization (2012), Readings(2014) and Du Bois and the General Strike (forthcoming).

View Event →
Enhancing America’s Reservoir of Goodwill in Southeast Asia
Oct
11
6:30 PM18:30

Enhancing America’s Reservoir of Goodwill in Southeast Asia

2017 marks the 40th anniversary of U.S.-ASEAN relations, but the countries that make up the dynamic, stable, and increasingly wealthy ASEAN alliance share anxieties over the possibility of U.S. disengagement from the region. There is diminishing confidence in a sustained American commitment to ASEAN, even as both sides maintain strong economic ties — the U.S. is the largest source of investment for ASEAN, and ASEAN is the United States’ fourth largest trading partner. This comes at a time when China’s influence and activism in the region is growing.

Join us for a discussion with Professor Kishore Mahbubani and Daniel Russel on how the U.S. — an architect and guarantor of the post-World War II global order — can restore its global standing by reversing the perception of disengagement from the Asia-Pacific region.

View Event →
Republic of Indonesia: Minister for Foreign Affairs Retno Marsudi
Sep
25
4:00 PM16:00

Republic of Indonesia: Minister for Foreign Affairs Retno Marsudi

The Asia Society is delighted to host Her Excellency Retno Marsudi, the Foreign Minister of the Republic of Indonesia, for an address for an address on “a Global Ecosystem of Peace and Stability,” followed by a moderated discussion with Asia Society Policy Institute’s Daniel Russel.

Minister Marsudi will provide insight into the county’s vision towards regional peace and stability in the face of current challenges.

View Event →
Republic of the Philippines: Secretary of Foreign Affairs Alan Cayetano
Sep
21
6:30 PM18:30

Republic of the Philippines: Secretary of Foreign Affairs Alan Cayetano

The Asia Society is delighted to host Secretary of Foreign Affairs Alan Peter S. Cayetano for a major policy address on Philippines-U.S. relations. His address will be followed by a moderated discussion.

Secretary Cayetano is in the position to provide insight into the Duterte administration’s foreign policy priorities — from the country’s relations with the U.S. and China, to its approach on the South China Sea disputes, to its pursuit of a more independent foreign policy. As the current chair of ASEAN, the Philippines will be hosting the East Asia Summit in Manila this November. What should observers expect to be on the agenda at the summit? Will there be a formal meeting between President Duterte and President Trump?

View Event →
Critical Issues in Asia: A Conversation with His Excellency Bilahari Kausikan, Ambassador-at-Large, Republic of Singapore
Sep
21
12:00 PM12:00

Critical Issues in Asia: A Conversation with His Excellency Bilahari Kausikan, Ambassador-at-Large, Republic of Singapore

  • Columbia University - International Affairs Building Room 918 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

No registration required. Valid University ID Required Upon Arrival.

Students are encouraged to bring questions about recent developments in the Asia Pacific region. Topics to be discussed include, but are not limited to, the impact of the Trump administration in East and Southeast Asia, US-China Relations, North Korea, and ASEAN at 50 years.

View Event →
Critical Perspectives on US-Southeast Asia Relations
Apr
4
to Apr 21

Critical Perspectives on US-Southeast Asia Relations

  • Columbia University - International Affairs Building, Room 918 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This two-day workshop will bring together scholars doing critical studies of bilateral relations between the United States, its western and regional allies, and a range of countries in Southeast Asia, both during the late Cold War era and since.

View Event →
Anthropology Colloquium: Meng Hang
Mar
17
3:00 PM15:00

Anthropology Colloquium: Meng Hang

  • McGraw Hall, 215, Cornell University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Limited Choices and Infinite Possibilities: How to Extricate East Asia and Southeast Asia from the Global Cultural Predicament: This lecture will reconsider the socio-historical processes of East Asia and Southeast Asia, their interconnectedness with the rest of the world.

Dr. Meng Hang is an associate professor of anthropology and an interdisciplinary writer in China. His research interests focus on social and cultural change in China, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Inner Asia and the West, history of anthropology, cultural studies, intercultural dialogue, ethnoarchaeology, culture difference and similarities. He has conducted long-term ethnographic fieldwork in China and Britain.

View Event →
American Ships, Chinese Mutinies: The Coolie Trade via Southeast Asia
Mar
1
12:00 PM12:00

American Ships, Chinese Mutinies: The Coolie Trade via Southeast Asia

  • Yale University - Room 203, Luce Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This presentation analyzes the role Southeast Asian ports, especially Angier (Anjer, West Java) and Manila, played in supporting the coolie trafficking network for the 125,000 abducted Chinese taken to Cuba. Records of several mutinies aboard American coolie transport ships reveal that these ports provided not only essential supply lines for overloaded coolie ships, but also administrative and legal infrastructure that supported the trafficking – and that they occasionally regulated extreme abuses of Chinese by the traffickers. Special attention is paid to mutinies aboard the Waverly off Manila in 1855, which resulted in arrest and imprisonment of surviving crew members, the Kate Hooper off Angier in 1857, and a crew mutiny on the Boston-based Staghound off Angier in 1860. The early role of British merchant James Tait, whose commercial activities in Manila and with the firm Jardine Mathieson in southern China, is also examined.

View Event →
Global Development at War: The United States and South Vietnam’s Struggle for Survival, 1968-1975
Feb
28
12:00 PM12:00

Global Development at War: The United States and South Vietnam’s Struggle for Survival, 1968-1975

  • Columbia University - International Affairs Building, Room 918 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Simon Toner offers a reinterpretation of the final years of the American War in Vietnam. Between 1968-1975, the United States and its South Vietnamese ally deployed development projects to shore up the Saigon regime’s authoritarian rule, and to foster an anti-Communist community in preparation for political competition with the Vietnamese Communists. In doing so, U.S. and South Vietnamese officials drew on the development experiences of anti-Communist regimes throughout Asia. The failure of these projects, more so than military setbacks, accounts for the collapse of South Vietnam in April 1975.

View Event →
On the Line: Intrepid and the Vietnam War Exhibition
Feb
18
8:00 PM20:00

On the Line: Intrepid and the Vietnam War Exhibition

The Intrepid Museum’s new exhibition "On the Line: Intrepid and the Vietnam War" explores the events and impact of the Vietnam War through the lens of Intrepid’s history. The exhibition, which opened in 2015 to mark the 40th anniversary of the conclusion of the war, offers a site-specific immersion into an important chapter of American history. The legendary aircraft carrier Intrepid served three tours of duty in Vietnam between 1966 and 1969. Set within the very spaces where men lived and served, the exhibition focuses on the experiences of Intrepid and its crew “on the line”—the periods when the ship was active in the Gulf of Tonkin, launching aircraft for missions over mainland Vietnam. This localized history serves as the starting point for understanding the larger historical landscape, including the Cold War, Operation Rolling Thunder and protests at home.

Links: 

Support the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum

Hosted by: 

  • Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum

View Event →